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Authorities estimate value of Diamond Bar pot-growing operation at about $4 million

LASD

Pot plants grow in the room of an upscale home in Diamond Bar.

LASD

Pot plants grow in the room of an upscale home in Diamond Bar.

LASD

Pot plants grow in the room of an upscale home in Diamond Bar.

LASD

Seedlings grow in the room of an upscale home in Diamond Bar.

LASD

The finished product, hanging out to dry.


The L.A. County Sheriff’s Department has released photos of the enormous indoor pot-growing operation taking place in an upscale Diamond Bar home, giving a sense of how big the farm was at the time it was raided earlier this week.

Seedlings grew, plants flourished under grow lights and harvested plants hung out to dry in the house’s cavernous rooms, which were sealed off and filtered to keep the smell from escaping to the outside, authorities said.

About 1,000 plants in various stages of growth were seized, along with 400 pounds of harvested marijuana -- an estimated value of about $4 million altogether, the sheriff’s department said.

The Monday evening bust on the 24000 block of Highcrest Drive also resulted in two arrests: 43-year-old Guoyun Zheng of El Monte and 32-year-old Bat Chenh of Alhambra were booked at Walnut Sheriff’s Station and are being held in lieu of $100,000 bail, the sheriff’s department said.

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Swanky Diamond Bar home shelters marijuana farm with hundreds of plants

marijuana

Photo by Alexodus via Flickr Creative Commons

Residents of an upscale area in Diamond Bar were surprised to learn that one house in their neighborhood was the site of a thriving indoor pot farm with more than 1,000 plants, and possibly more than 2,000.

CBS reports that authorities raided the million-dollar home, located on the 24000 block of Highcrest Drive, on Monday night, shutting down the operation and arresting two men.

The plants -- flourishing under grow lights, with filters installed to block the smell from outside -- each had an estimated value of $2,000. Authorities said the operation may have been in place there for three years or longer, with no one the wiser, according to some reports.

Despite those precautions, it was the operation’s high energy usage that eventually did it in: Investigators said they became aware of the pot farm after a worker for Southern California Edison noticed unusually high power readings on a meter at the house, according to CBS.

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