Southern California breaking news and trends

Will calorie counts on drive-thru menus at McDonald's make you healthier?

McDonalds

Detailed look at the calories on the McDonald's menu

McDonald's

Detailed look at the McCafe drinks at McDonalds.

McDonald's

A detailed look at the sweets on the McDonald's menu.

McDonald's

McDonald's new menu board with calorie count.


Do you really want to know how many calories that McRib has in it when you order a combo in the drive-thru? 

In order to be in compliance with upcoming federal health care requirements, drive-thru customers at McDonald's next week will soon see the cold, hard facts next to photos of their warm, soft burgers.  

"At McDonald's, we recognize customers want to know more about the nutrition content of the food and beverages they order,"  McDonald's USA President Jan Fields said in a statement Tuesday. "As a company that has provided nutrition information for more than 30 years, we are pleased to add to the ways we make nutrition information available to our customers and employees."  

So the question is, will you be less inclined to order a Big Mac Extra Value Meal if you see that you ingesting about 1,000 calories?

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Go East: 626 Night Market expanding to two days, moving to Arcadia

Night Market

Mae Ryan/KPCC

Leo Wu and his friends use a traditional recipe from Beijing for their lamb kebabs.

Night Market

Mae Ryan/KPCC

Thousands walk through Old Pasadena to taste dishes from all over Asia at the 626 Night Market.

Night Market

Mae Ryan/KPCC

The Kebab Brothers prepare lamb kebabs with cumin and charcoal.

Night Market

Mae Ryan/KPCC

Sponsored by Yelp, the 626 Night Market showcases local businesses and helps entrepreneurs gain exposure.

Night Market

Mae Ryan/KPCC

Hong Kong Kitchen sells braised pork to customers at the 626 Night Market.

Night Market

Mae Ryan/KPCC

A large crowd squeezed onto N Oakland Ave in Old Pasadena for the night market.

Night Market

Mae Ryan/KPCC

A father and his son take a break from the overcrowded market.

Night Market

Mae Ryan/KPCC

A business owner makes pancakes at the 626 Night Market on April 15th, 2012.


The wildly popular 626 Night Market is leaving Pasadena and heading to the far more spacious infield at Santa Anita Racetrack in Arcadia. The free event that attracted approximately 40,000 people in July is expanding to encompass two nights in late October.

The first 626 Night Market in April was a bigger success than expected as more than 20,000 attendees packed a city block near Pasadena City Hall standing in long lines in hopes of doing some shopping and tasting hard-to-find Asian food. 

Many were so upset they took to social media to complain.

"We had a lot of negative comments and that hurt us a lot," Aileen Xu, spokeswoman for the 626 Night Market told KPCC earlier this summer. "You can almost say we were too successful that we failed."

The second Night Market was a much smoother affair as organizers added many more retailers and food vendors and worked out a larger space.

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LA vegan attempts to change In-N-Out's unchanged menu

Tony Pierce / KPCC

In N Out employees cooking up burgers on the grill at the Westwood location.

The adage says, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" and judging from the long lines that stretch out from nearly every one of the Califonia-based In-N-Out restaurants, there's nothing broken.

But local vegan Ari Solomon would like to fix that. 

He would like the wildly successful hamburger chain, that hasn't changed its official menu since 1948, to offer a veggie burger. Nearly 3,000 people have agreed with him. 

Last week the New Jersey native (whose faint accent gives him away) went to Change.org and started a petition to influence the burger joint to expand their offerings, and within ten days got over 2,800 electronic signatures.

"I think a veggie burger would be a natural progression for them as a restaurant," Solomon told KPCC via telephone. "It's the 21st century. So many people are looking for ways to make healthier choices in regards to what they eat," Solomon said, noting that the chain should also consider the menu change because it's better for the enviornment.

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Food labeling measure qualifies for November ballot

Mercer 10515

AquaBounty Technologies

A measure on the November ballot will ask voters whether they want to label genetically engineered foods.

Genetically engineered food would be labeled as such should a November ballot initiative be approved by California voters. 

The measure qualified for the ballot yesterday after the Secretary of State’s Office reviewed a sampling of the signatures collected by the California Right to Know campaign.

According to the ballot language, raw or processed foods made from genetically altered plants or animals would have to be labeled as such. Those foods could not be advertised as “natural.”

Exemptions would include certified organic products, restaurant food, products containing a small amount of genetically engineer materials, and food made from animals fed or injected with genetically engineered materials.

It could cost $1 million a year to enforce the regulation, according to the state’s Legislative Analyst and director of Finance.

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