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PHOTOS: Your views of Space Shuttle Endeavour

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Endeavour

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The scene from beneath Endeavour's wing

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The space shuttle Endeavour will take off on its final mission across the streets of L.A. this Thursday night, and we've got the where, when and how to take your own photographs of the historic trek across the city.

And we want to see your photos of this monumental event! But beware: Getting up close and personal with the shuttle on its last journey won’t be easy. 

Police are closing off the streets and sidewalks near the travel route, so it's up to you to get creative shots of the shuttle as it moves through the city.

Check out our map of the travel route and start thinking about creative locations that aren’t directly along the closed-off streets where you could catch a good view.

The shuttle will make pit stops along the way, so those events will be your best bets for close-ups and shuttle party pics.

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Speculation to observation: NASA finds evidence of ancient, flowing stream on Mars (PHOTOS)

NASA's Curiosity rover found evidence for an ancient, flowing stream on Mars

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA's Curiosity rover found evidence for an ancient, flowing stream on Mars at a few sites, including the rock outcrop pictured here, which the science team has named "Hottah" after Hottah Lake in Canada’s Northwest Territories.

mars curiosity rock outcrops

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS and PSI

Rock Outcrops on Mars and Earth: This set of images compares the Link outcrop of rocks on Mars (left) with similar rocks seen on Earth (right). The image of Link, obtained by NASA's Curiosity rover, shows rounded gravel fragments, or clasts, up to a couple inches (few centimeters), within the rock outcrop. Erosion of the outcrop results in gravel clasts that fall onto the ground, creating the gravel pile at left. The outcrop characteristics are consistent with a sedimentary conglomerate, or a rock that was formed by the deposition of water and is composed of many smaller rounded rocks cemented together. A typical Earth example of sedimentary conglomerate formed of gravel fragments in a stream is shown on the right. An annotated version of the image highlights a piece of gravel that is about 0.4 inches (1 centimeter) across. It was selected as an example of coarse size and rounded shape. Rounded grains (of any size) occur by abrasion in sediment transport, by wind or water, when the grains bounce against each other. Gravel fragments are too large to be transported by wind. At this size, scientists know the rounding occurred in water transport in a stream. The name Link is derived from a significant rock formation in the Northwest Territories of Canada, where there is also a lake with the same name. Scientists enhanced the color in the Mars image to show the scene as it would appear under the lighting conditions we have on Earth, which helps in analyzing the terrain. The Link outcrop was imaged with the 100-millimeter Mast Camera on Sept. 2, 2012, which was the 27th sol, or Martian day of operations.

curiosity ancient stream bed

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Link to a Watery Past: In this image from NASA's Curiosity rover, a rock outcrop called Link pops out from a Martian surface that is elsewhere blanketed by reddish-brown dust. The Link outcrop was imaged with the 100-millimeter Mast Camera on Sept. 2, 2012, which was the 27th sol, or Martian day of operations. The name Link is derived from a significant rock formation in the Northwest Territories of Canada, where there is also a lake with the same name. Scientists enhanced the color in this version to show the Martian scene as it would appear under the lighting conditions we have on Earth, which helps in analyzing the terrain.

curiosity finds evidence of ancient flowing stream

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA's Curiosity rover found evidence for an ancient, flowing stream on Mars at a few sites, including the rock outcrop pictured here, which the science team has named "Hottah" after Hottah Lake in Canada’s Northwest Territories.


Curiosity has seen evidence of an ancient, flowing stream on Mars. The secret is in the Martian gravel. 

NASA reports, "The shapes tell you they were transported and the sizes tell you they couldn't be transported by wind. They were transported by water flow," said Curiosity science co-investigator Rebecca Williams of the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Ariz.

The sizes and shapes of the stones cemented into conglomerate rock at the discovery sites offer clues about the speed and distance of the stream. The gravels ranges in size from as small a grain of sand, to as large as a golf ball. 

Earlier evidence suggested the presence of water on Mars, but the discovery of "rocks containing ancient streambed gravels -- is the first of its kind," says NASA.

"From the size of gravels it carried, we can interpret the water was moving about 3 feet per second, with a depth somewhere between ankle and hip deep," said Curiosity science co-investigator William Dietrich of the University of California, Berkeley. "Plenty of papers have been written about channels on Mars with many different hypotheses about the flows in them. This is the first time we're actually seeing water-transported gravel on Mars. This is a transition from speculation about the size of streambed material to direct observation of it."

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Live video: Endeavour's final flight around California

Our partners at NBCLA are providing a live video stream of Endeavour's last trip around the Golden State.

If you are out there and you are taking photos feel free to share them with us by tagging them #KPCC on Twitter so we can see them and possibly use them on the site.

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Live video: Endeavour's final flight around California

APTOPIX Space Shuttle Last Stop

David J. Phillip/AP

Space shuttle Endeavour flies over Ellington Field in Houston atop the shuttle aircraft carrier Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. Endeavour is making a final trek across the country to the California Science Center in Los Angeles, where it will be permanently displayed.

Our partners at NBCLA are providing a live video stream of Endeavour's last trip around the Golden State.

If you are out there and you are taking photos feel free to share them with us by tagging them #KPCC on Twitter so we can see them and possibly use them on the site.

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Why does NASA spell Endeavour wrong?

Space Shuttle Last Stop

David J. Phillip/AP

Space shuttle Endeavour sits atop the shuttle aircraft carrier after landing Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012, at Ellington Field in Houston. Endeavour is making a final trek across the country to the California Science Center in Los Angeles, where it will be permanently displayed.

AP

This file photo from 2007 shows a banner with the incorrect spelling of the shuttle that was up for about 90 minutes before being replaced by one with the correct spelling.

US space shuttles Discovery (L) and Ende

BRUCE WEAVER/AFP/Getty Images

US space shuttles Discovery (L) and Endeavour (R) on August 11, 2011 are positioned for a photo during a move that swapped storage areas at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Endeavour will head to the California Science Center in Los Angeles.


NASA's beloved Endeavour is making its last victory lap in the sky tomorrow, piggy-backed atop a 747. 

Putting one aircraft on top of another, in this case, makes practical sense. But why would NASA endeavor to add a useless "u" in the spelling of Endeavour? 

Despite the fact that NASA and Endeavour are American, the shuttle was named after the first ship commanded by the legendary 18th century British explorer and mathematician James Cook.

Related: Full coverage of Endeavour landing in LA

Commissioned by King George III, the maiden voyage of the HM Bark Endeavour was commanded by then-Lt. Cook to sail into the South Pacific and around Tahiti. Its mission was space-related as the Brits wanted to observe the 1769 passage of Venus between the Earth and the Sun.

The entire voyage took nearly three years and almost ended in tragedy when the ship had a close call near the Great Barrier Reef.

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