Southern California breaking news and trends

LA budget, sanitation officials split over trash pickup for businesses, apartments

VICA president

Alice Walton/KPCC

VICA's Stuart Waldman speaks at City Hall in support of a plan to move the city's trash pickup to a non-exclusive franchise.

A proposal to change how private trash companies collect refuse from Los Angeles businesses and apartment buildings could generate as much as $30 million a year in new revenue, according to a report from the city’s top budget official.

A study from City Administrative Officer Miguel Santana recommends moving the city to a non-exclusive franchise model. That means qualified haulers would be required to obtain a franchise agreement from the city. Earlier this year, the Bureau of Sanitation recommended moving to an exclusive franchise where the city's six trash zones would be subdivided into 11 collection areas. Each collection area would have one primary hauler. 

“A non-exclusive franchise preserves an open, competitive marketplace which is the most significant factor in maintaining price controls, and where the primary business model concerns business-to-business relationships, not business-to-city relationships,” Santana wrote in his report.

Read More...

Maven's Morning Coffee: Alarcon's preliminary hearing goes on, while Yaroslavsky stays out of mayor's race

City Councilman Richard Alarcon

Andres Aguila/KPCC

One of L.A. City Councilman Richard Alarcon's neighbors testified that it appeared no one lived at the official residence from 2006 to 2009.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, public meetings and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Friday, Aug. 24, and here is what's happening in Los Angeles:

Headlines

At Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alarcon's preliminary hearing, a neighbor testified that it appeared no one lived at the councilman's official residence from 2006 to 2009, according to the Los Angeles Times. The neighbor told a downtown courtroom that trash bins were not placed outside, weeds would grow tall, and there were rarely any cars at the home.

Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky's decision not to run for mayor leaves a hole and gives the candidates space not to answer tough questions on the city's budget, a Los Angeles Times editorial says. "It is the responsibility of those who run to address these issues, even without a rival to force the debate," according to the piece.

Read More...

Zev Yaroslavsky opts not to run to be Los Angeles's next mayor (updated)

Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky

Andres Aguila/KPCC

Despite more than a year of speculation, Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky will not run for mayor of Los Angeles.

After more than a year of speculation, Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky announced today he will not run for mayor of Los Angeles because “it’s time for a new generation of leaders to emerge and guide this region into the future."

Yaroslavsky, 63, has served in elected office since he first joined to the L.A. City Council in 1975. He was later elected to the Board of Supervisors, a job he has held since 1994.

“Beginning as a 26-year-old councilman, I have quite literally come of age in public life at the forefront of Los Angeles’ most critical issues. While I have never been a supporter of term limits, I do believe that four decades is long enough for any citizen to hold elective office, especially in an executive capacity,” Yaroslavsky said in a statement on his website.

Deciding whether to run for mayor has been “one of the most difficult decisions of my political life,” Yaroslavsky said.

Read More...

Maven's Morning Coffee: Zev out of mayor's race, LA fails to punish scofflaw banks

Foreclosure

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

The city of Los Angeles is suppose to fine banks $1,000 a day if a foreclosed home becomes blighted. Despite thousands of foreclosures, Los Angeles has issued one fine, reports the Daily News.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, public meetings and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Thursday, Aug. 23, and here is what's happening in Los Angeles:

Headlines

Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky will not run for mayor. "Simply put, it’s time for a new generation of leaders to emerge and guide this region into the future," he said. The announcement was made in a statement posted to Yaroslavsky's website.

The city of Los Angeles has failed to fine banks for allowing foreclosed properties to become blighted, according to the Daily News. Under city law, banks are supposed to be fined $1,000 a day if properties fall into disrepair. Building and Safety does not have enough inspectors to check on homes and fine the banks, reports the newspaper.

Read More...

LAPD to work with federal drug agents to close down medical marijuana clinics

Pot/Marijuana Stock Photo

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Los Angeles City Council directed the LAPD to work with federal drug agents on putting together a strategy to ensure medical marijuana clinics close down once the city's ban is in place.

With the clock ticking down to the city’s complete ban on medical marijuana clinics, the Los Angeles City Council today asked police officers to work with federal agents and the District Attorney’s Office on ensuring that dispensaries close. 

Following a closed session discussion, the council directed the Los Angeles Police Department to partner with the federal Drug Enforcement Administration in creating a citywide enforcement strategy. There are an estimated 800 to 1,000 collectives in the city, and on Sept. 6 they must all close.

The City Attorney's Office was also instructed to report back on ongoing litigation. Last week, the Patient Care Alliance-Los Angeles sued the city to stop enforcement of the ban. The group, which includes patients, vendors and clinic owners, argues there is a constitutional right to assemble for the purpose of using medical marijuana, which is legal under California law.

Read More...