Southern California breaking news and trends

Matt Groening draws attention with star no. 2,459 on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

20th Century Fox Marketing

Matt Groening, creator of "The Simpsons" and recent $500,000 donor to UCLA's School of Film, Theater and Television, will be honored Tuesday with star no. 2,459 on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Groening's sidewalk homage to celestial gas will be located at 7021 Hollywood Blvd, not far from the star of his famous Springfield family.

The ceremony for the 12-time Emmy Award winner begins at 11:30 a.m. and will be hosted by Hollywood Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Leron Gubler. Guest speakers Hank Azaria (aka: Moe, Chief Wiggum, many more) and Yeardley Smith (voice of Lisa Simpson) will also be at the event.

Groening moved to Los Angeles in 1977 and began channelling his city stress into Binky, a rabbit cartoon featured in his "Life In Hell" comics. James L. Brooks approached the cartoonist in 1987 about an animated short stint on "The Tracey Ullman Show." 

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The Simpsons 500-episode marathon begins in Hollywood

20th Century Fox Marketing

Shhhh.... tv.

Like something out of that twilighty show about that zone, one hundred people will begin competing Wed. Feb 8 for the honor of top couch potato as The Simpsons 500 Ultimate Fan Marathon Challenge powers on in Hollywood.

In celebration of show's 500th episode later this month, and in an effort to set a new Guinness World Record for longest continuous television watching, Twentieth Century Fox is moving the marketing team from Century City to the center of Hollywood & Highland to run a 500-episode marathon for super fans.

90 people were selected from online applications to compete, with additional spots coming from random drawings and trivia winners. Rules and regulations are detailed on the main contest page including information about how to become a standby viewer. 

It will take around 200 hours to watch the episodes -- that's just 64 hours short of the scientifically monitored record set for a human to go without sleep in 1965, notes the L.A. Times.

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