Southern California breaking news and trends

Advisory: Winter winds through Wednesday, cold continues

WINDY WINDS WEATHER VANE

Photo by Garry Knight via Flickr Creative Commons

The National Weather Service has issued a wind advisory — winds of 35 mph or greater — for Los Angeles and other areas in the region beginning Tuesday night and continuing into Wednesday. The strongest gusts are expected over L.A. and Ventura counties.

A cold low pressure system is expected to move through the area Tuesday and into Northern Baja by Wednesday. Some of the interior valleys may experience another night of sub-freezing temperatures and patchy frost.

Use caution while driving; gusty cross winds could create hazardous road conditions, especially for high profile vehicles.

7-DAY FORECAST (Los Angeles)

  • New Year's Day: Sunny, with a high near 63. Calm wind becoming east southeast around 5 mph.
  • Tonight: Mostly clear, with a low around 45. East southeast wind 5 to 10 mph becoming north northeast in the evening.
  • Wednesday: Sunny, with a high near 67. North northwest wind 5 to 10 mph.
  • Wednesday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 45. Calm wind becoming north around 5 mph in the evening.
  • Thursday: Sunny, with a high near 68. North wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the morning.
  • Thursday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 47.
  • Friday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 69.
  • Friday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 49.
  • Saturday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 67.
  • Saturday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 51.
  • Sunday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 65.
  • Sunday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 49.
  • Monday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 61.

Read More...

If 5,500 trees fall in Pasadena: The 'Tree Failure' windstorm report

Los Angeles Area Hit With Powerful Santa Ana Winds

David McNew/Getty Images

A boy whose school was closed climbs fallen trees on Green Street after strong Santa Ana Winds that are cauing the worst local wind damage in decades on Dec. 1, 2011 in Pasadena.

Hold on to your hats, a 27-page report called the "Pasadena Windstorm Tree Failure Analysis" has been made public by the city's Urban Forestry Advisory Committee.

Prepared for the city's Department of Public Works, the study examines data on nearly 5,500 trees that were damaged in the historic windstorms  -- with wind speeds reaching 100 miles per hour within the City of Pasadena -- on November 30 and December 1, 2011.

An analysis of tree failures by the Davey Resource Group showed the city’s urban forest suffered "severe losses" with approximately 9% of the trees damaged in the high winds. Costs to the city are projected to be in the tens of millions of dollars with hundreds of light poles and buildings also damaged in the storm.

The City of Pasadena maintains that it maintains about 57,500 trees in over 64,500 city locations. The report asserts that the "unpreventable wide variety of damage to the urban forest structure" was primarily caused by wind intensity and direction, and that the existing tree maintainence program prevented more damage from occuring.

Read More...

Wildfire warning: A 'red flag' blows in the dry SoCal wind

Mercer 1111

AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

This Aug. 30, 2009 file photo shows a deer escaping a wildfire in the Angeles National Forest near Los Angeles.

Gusty winds and dry air have created a perfect storm for fire weather in the Los Angeles/Oxnard region prompting the National Weather Service to issue an urgent "red flag warning" on Monday. The Antelope Valley and foothills are officially on alert beginning at noon, and continuing into Tuesday evening.

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection keeps a list of current major fire incidents on its website, and also posts updates via its official CAL Fire Twitter accounts.

The Los Angeles Fire Department has a preparedness guide and action plan to help protect your home, your family and yourself, in the event of a disasterous wind-driven wildfire.

Lisa Brenner can be reached via Twitter @lisa_brenner

Read More...

Blow the man down: Wednesday winds to bully LA mountains, desert, I-5 corridor

WINDY WINDS WEATHER VANE

Photo by Garry Knight via Flickr Creative Commons

Furious winds got the best of 50 power poles overnight in the Antelope Valley. Southern California Edison says it could take days to replace them, however only four Lancaster residents experienced a service interruption, said spokesman Daniel Brady.

The Antelope Valley and Santa Clarita Valley remain in high-wind-warning mode, and the mountains of Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties are on alert through early Thursday morning, says the National Weather Service.

Gusts reached 65 mph on Tuesday in some areas. Forecasters warn that the next round of Wednesday winds may bring even beefier blasts. The strongest blows are expected to bully L.A. mountains and the I-5 corridor. 

NWS urges driver caution in mountain regions, and in desert areas where blowing sand could be an additional issue.

Read More...

Storm troopers: LA and OC slosh through a wet and wild Friday

storm trooper, stormtrooper, weather, rain, umbrella

Photo by Kristina Alexanderson via Flickr Creative Commons

Northern Orange County was on alert Friday when the National Weather Service issued a severe thunderstorm warning that included the possibility of a small tornado. According to the OC Register, a waterspout was sighted off the coast.

A flood advisory and hazardous weather statement were issued for areas in and around Los Angeles, and forecasters were also warning of gusts up to 60 mph in sections of the Southland.

Earlier Friday, Southern California Edison reported power outages in Palos Verdes, Santa Monica, West Hollywood and Santa Clarita, and the LADWP said Friday afternoon via Twitter that about 5,000 of its 1.4 million customers were without electricity. Those outages were affecting Exposition Park, Gramercy Park, Westlake and Del Rey ,NBC LA reports.

So what does this mean for the "Play Me, I'm Yours" outdoor piano installation? Artists reportedly prepared for precipitation, and coated accordingly with a water sealant. Public art stops for no storm. 

Read More...