Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: Shakeup coming to Board of Supervisors, LAUSD wants more cops, former state senator heads to jail (updated)

DCFS foster care

Karen Foshay/KPCC

The Los Angeles Times considers the major shakeup coming to the Board of Supervisors.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Friday, Oct. 31 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Gov. Jerry Brown cast his ballot yesterday, days ahead of Tuesday's election. The governor declined to say what he decided on Propositions 45 and 46, or which candidate he picked for state superintendent. "Those I’m going to leave to the secrecy of the ballot," he told the Sacramento Bee.

The Los Angeles Times reports the Board of Supervisors is making major decisions in the weeks leading up to the biggest shift in the board's makeup in decades. "Facing a historic changing of the guard, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has been making moves designed to solidify what members view as a legacy of fiscal responsibility, and some believe, box in their successors on key personnel and labor decisions," per the Times.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Maria Elena Durazo leaves county Fed, Supervisor Antonovich endorses his chief of staff, a look at Measure E in Orange County

Car Wash MALDEF Unions

Grant Slater/KPCC

Maria Elena Durazo, executive secretary-treasurer of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, addressed the crowd at Santa Monica Car Wash where union officials and community leaders rallied Monday, May 21.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Thursday, Oct. 30 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

The county Fed's Maria Elena Durazo is leaving to work on immigration and civil rights issues for Unite Here, the hospitality industry's union. "I have proudly led a movement that has extended the hand of labor to those who need us the most—those workers whose access to the American Dream have been blocked by poverty and callous employers," Durazo said in announcing her departure. LA Times, KPCC, Daily News

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Impact of minimum wage proposal, LAUSD suspends travel, debate over development in Malibu

PICO UNION  003

Benjamin Brayfield/KPCC

Claudia Chi Ku braids the hair of her daughter, Leslie Soriano, 11, as her other children play outside of their apartment in Pico Union. Chi Ku supports her family while working as a cashier at a restaurant in the neighborhood.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Wednesday, Oct. 29 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

As the city of Los Angeles studies the impact of increasing the minimum wage, KPCC talked to a minimum wage employee and employer to see how their lives could changes under the proposal.

KPCC considers the environmental impact of your vote for state controller. The controller sits on the State Lands Commission, which means either Betty Yee or Ashley Swearengin will have a say over fracking, coastal access and Malibu's Broad Beach.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Jim McDonnell's tenure in Long Beach, ballot measures in Irvine, new plants at Getty House

Jim McDonnell & Eric Garcetti

The Los Angeles Times considers what Jim McDonnell would be like as the next sheriff of L.A. County.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 28 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

The Los Angeles Times considers how Jim McDonnell's tenure as Long Beach police chief may be a preview of his style as the next sheriff of Los Angeles County. "My goal has been to police in a constitutional manner, to be respectful, to solve problems instead of addressing symptoms, to be compassionate. We're often dealing with people on the worst day of their lives," McDonnell said.

The Orange County Register breaks down two measure on the city of Irvine's ballot. Measure V would require fiscal transparency for the Great Park and Measure W would create term limits for city council members and the mayor.

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Last day to request a mail-in ballot: How to make sure it gets counted

Ballot Printing Facility

Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Sample ballots for Los Angeles County are finished and ready to be packaged for shipment. The Los Angeles County Registrar/Recorder-Clerk mails millions each election.

Since 2012, a majority of California's voters have been voting by mail. But a rising percentage of those ballots are not being counted because the envelopes arrive too late or have invalid signatures.

The rate of rejected mail-in ballots is at a record high level for California, said Mindy Romero,  director of the California Civic Engagement Project at UC Davis. A study by the Pew Center  said California has one of the nation's higher rates for rejected mail-in ballots.

Romero's study of voter data found that 1 percent of mail-in ballots were rejected in the November 2012 presidential election. That percentage rose to 2.9 percent in the June 2014 primary, when about 91,000 votes that were not counted.

Those votes would have made a difference in the very close race to get into the controller's runoff, where the top two places were decided by just 481 votes.

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