Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Help wanted: DC lobbyist for LA's 112 year old water agency

Help wanted: DC lobbyist

Kitty Felde/KPCC

The Department of Water and Power is looking for a new lobbyist on Capitol Hill.

An advertisement recently appeared in The Hill newspaper, a Washington political daily, next to a blurb for a kitchen design company and a resume writing service:

REQUEST FOR A PROPOSAL

Department of Water and Power of the City of Los Angeles invites proposals from experienced and qualified firms interested in providing Federal Legislative Consulting Services.

In other words, the DWP is shopping for a lobbyist.

The ad doesn't specify how much the job pays, but looking at federal filings from this year and last, individual lobbying agencies can expect to make about $10,000 a month. Last year, the DWP spent more than half a million dollars on DC lobbying with three agencies:

  • Dentons specializes in energy issues. It's the largest recipient of lobbying dollars from the DWP: $330,000 so far over the past 18 months. 
  • The Furman Group represents the DWP on water policy: They got $290,000.
  • Van Ness Feldman, the third lobbying group, says it represents clients in energy, environment, land use, and real estate: The DWP paid it $150,000.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Helping mentally ill inmates, a ruling on LA's pension system, thousands apply to LAFD

The Men's Central Jail in downtown Los A

ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

The Board of Supervisors will consider a $20 million plan to help the mentally ill avoid jail and move into other treatments.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Tuesday, July 29, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

The L.A. County Board of Supervisors will consider a plan to spend $20 million on diverting mentally ill offenders from jail, reports KPCC. "Inmates with mental illness will not get better in this environment. The question is what are we prepared to commit to changing this," said Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas.

LA Weekly looks at the thousands of L.A. County residents who live in cars. "In neighborhoods such as Venice, residents fault car dwellers for discarding waste on the streets (human and otherwise), drug dealing, crime and, perhaps worst of all: hoarding the city's precious few street parking spots," according to the piece.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Jerry Brown visits Mexico, Congress wants the Dodgers back on TV, Paul Tanaka gets a hefty paycheck

Governor Brown Declares Statewide Drought Emergency

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Gov. Jerry Brown is in Mexico to meet with officials about economic and environmental cooperation with California.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Monday, July 28, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

In Rick Orlov's Tipoff column, the L.A. City Council returns from summer vacation and politicians look ahead to the 2016 and 2018 elections.

Gov. Jerry Brown is on his way to Mexico to meet with lawmakers about economic and environmental cooperation with California, according to the Sacramento Bee. Brown's delegation includes 100 lawmakers, business leaders and administration officials.

In 2013, former Undersheriff Paul Tanaka was the second highest-paid employee in Los Angeles County at $591,000, reports the Daily News. That figure includes unused sick leave and vacation days that were paid out when Tanaka retired. He is now running for sheriff.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Garcetti chairs Metro, Purple Line gets a contractor, LAPD officers consider new contract

Purple line to reach La Cienega

Todd Johnson/KPCC File Photo

Metro selected a contractor for the Metro Purple Line Thursday.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Friday, July 25, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Mayor Eric Garcetti says his top priority as chair of Metro is reducing traffic congestion, according to the Daily News. "All our priorities have to be in reducing traffic. Traffic keeps us from our loved ones and costs us billions of dollars in productivity. Traffic doesn’t care about borders," the mayor said.

Metro board members selected Skanska USA to build the Metro Purple Line extension, even though another construction firm said it could do the project for less money, according to the Los Angeles Times. "I'm having a hard time leaving $192 million on the table. This process is extremely flawed," said Supervisor Don Knabe, who sits on the board.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Richard Alarcon found guilty, LAUSD negotiates with union, history of freeways in LA

City Councilman Richard Alarcon

Andres Aguila/KPCC

Former Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alarcon was convicted of four felonies Wednesday for lying about where he lived while he served on the council.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Thursday, July 24, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Former L.A. City Councilman Richard Alarcon was convicted of four felonies Wednesday for lying about where he lived. Alarcon could face as much as six years in state prison when he's sentenced in September. KPCC, Los Angeles Times, Daily News

Former Bell Mayor George Cole was sentenced to home confinement for his role in the city's corruption scandal, reports the Los Angeles Times. "There’s no way to express the shame, the remorse," Cole said at his sentencing.

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