Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: Governor's prison plan, evaluations at LAUSD, CEQA gets a fresh look

Gov. Brown Signs Legislation At Google HQ That Allows Testing Of Autonomous Vehicles

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Gov. Jerry Brown wants to spend $315 million this year to move inmates to local lockups and out-of-state facilities. California is under a federal court order to reduce its prison population.

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Today is Wednesday, Aug. 28, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Gov. Jerry Brown wants to spend $315 million this year to put inmates in local lockups as a federal court demands California reduce its prison population, reports the Sacramento Bee. The spending proposal puts the governor at odds with other Democratic leaders. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg is expected to release his own plan later this morning.

Mayor Eric Garcetti named a USC associate dean as the chief of the Office of Immigrant Affairs, reports KPCC. Linda Lopez will be responsible for helping immigrants connect with city services.

Los Angeles Times writer and KPCCer Patt Morrison talks with LAUSD Board member Monica Ratliff. Asked about Superintendent John Deasy, Ratliff says, "I believe he's open to feedback, he's open to constructive criticism, I've really enjoyed working with him, and his commitment to students is without question."

The release of individual performance ratings for public school teachers has again been delayed, according to the Los Angeles Times, which is fighting for their release. The move is opposed by the teachers' union and Los Angeles Unified School District, who argue "immediate release of the scores will cause irreparable harm to privacy rights, and that harm dramatically outweighs any prejudice or inconvenience that might be caused by a brief delay in public release of the records."

Former AEG executive Tim Leiweke talks to Los Angeles Magazine about his abrupt exit from the company and Los Angeles. "Being in a situation where we didn’t finish everything we wanted to finish in L.A. humbles you because you feel like you let some people down. And I do feel like I’ve let some people down," he says.

Which Way, LA? looks at efforts to reform the California Environmental Quality Act.

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