Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: Government shutdown's impact in Southern California, Garcetti's appointment process, new seat for the Board of Supervisors?

Desert Shutdown

Grant Slater/KPCC

A park ranger sits in a patrol SUV overlooking the entrance to the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument. The gates and visitor center are closed up tight. KPCC looks at how the shutdown is impacting one Congressional district.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

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Today is Thursday, Oct. 10, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Three-quarters of Mayor Eric Garcetti's city commissioners are friends, former staffers, campaign backers or relatives of campaign backers, according to the Los Angeles Times. "An appointment process should really have the broadest reach possible, to draw on the talents that Los Angeles has to offer. If the search is limited to friends, family and donors of a mayor, that is too limited of a circle," says Kathay Feng with California Common Cause.

KPCC looks at how the federal government shutdown is impacting one Congressional district that has an equal number of Republicans and Democrats. "Members of both parties were unimpressed at Rep. Raul Ruiz crossing the aisle to vote with Republicans," according to the station.

L.A. County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas supports the creation of a second Latino-majority seat on the Board of Supervisors, according to Bill Boyarsky over at LAObserved. "The (best) likelihood it will be accomplished is through the courts," Ridley-Thomas says.

Assembly Speaker John Perez announced Wednesday he will run for state controller in next year's election, per KPCC.

A judge has rejected an attempt to block the Los Angeles Times from publishing information in the background files of sheriff's deputies, according to the newspaper. The Association for Los Angeles Deputy Sheriffs argued the paper should be prevented from disclosing information that violates employees' privacy.

Pressers

None

Upcoming Votes

Friday

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