Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: LA's partnership on quakes, leadership change in Sacramento, Long Beach's mayoral race

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TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

Two men inspect damage to cars and apartment complex after Northridge earthquake, on January 21, 1994, in Canoga, California. As the city prepares for the 20th anniversary of the quake, Mayor Eric Garcetti announced a new partnership with a U.S.G.S. seismologist to review the city's preparedness.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee — a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

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Today is Wednesday, Jan. 15, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Mayor Eric Garcetti announced a partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey's Dr. Lucy Jones, who will spend the year studying how Los Angeles could be impacted by a major earthquake. "There's tremendous momentum," the mayor said of efforts to make L.A. safer. KPCC, Los Angeles Times, Daily News 

Also Tuesday, the mayor's official SUV struck a pedestrian in downtown. Mayor Eric Garcetti was a passenger at the time. He told LAPD investigators he did not witness the crash because he was on his cell phone. Security footage from the nearby Los Angeles Times captured part of the incident. KPCC

Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg said "it is clear" that the state Senate's next leader will be Kevin de Leon, reports Capitol Alert. "I'm looking forward to leading when my time comes up," de Leon said.

KPCC looks at the crowded field of candidates hoping to be mayor of Long Beach. There will be 10 candidates on the April 8 primary ballot.

A report from L.A. County found three-quarters of excessive force cases paid out on behalf of the Sheriff's Department involve deputies and not jailers, reports City News Service. The county spent $43 million last year on lawsuits involving the Sheriff's Department — an increase over the previous year.

LAObserved contributor Bill Boyarsky considers why the 2020 Commission gave public transit the cold shoulder in its latest report. "I was disappointed that the commission took such a superficial and wrong-headed look at so important a subject," he writes.

Pressers

None

Upcoming Votes

Wednesday

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