Represent!

Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: Cycling in LA, city's first technology officer, LAUSD spends millions to retrofit

68584 full
68584 full

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Wednesday, Feb. 5, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Los Angeles Times writer Steve Lopez writes about the experience of cycling to work. "Riding a bike on streets jammed with vehicles, many of them piloted by distracted and incompetent drivers, seems like a terrible idea. I don't swim in shark tanks, either," Lopez writes.

Mayor Eric Garcetti hired Peter Marx of Qualcomm to serve as the city's chief innovation technology officer, reports the Daily News. Marx will work on the city's 311 app and analyze the city's data with the goal of improving services.

Also, Mayor Garcetti celebrated his birthday with some cupcakes, per LAObserved.

Attorney and women's rights activist Sandra Fluke will forgo a run for Congress to instead run for the state Senate, her campaign announced Wednesday. Fluke will run for the seat being vacated by Ted Lieu. "I am eager to get to work fighting for the causes that matter most to our future as a community, state and nation," she said in a statement.

The LAUSD will spend $41 million to retrofit two buildings in Sylmar, reports KPCC. Demolition will start in 2016 and the projects are expected to be completed in 2019.

The Long Beach City Council agreed to increase pay at the city's airport and convention center, reports the Press-Telegram. "The law applies to future contractors and sets a minimum wage of $13.26 per hour for various service employees at the facilities," according to the piece.

The L.A. Coalition pens an op-ed for the Los Angeles Business Journal on the lack of job creation. "Mayor Eric Garcetti and the City Council’s strong leadership can turn this around by leveraging the city’s economic and workforce development tools, which include land-use and regulatory policies, business incentives, infrastructure, and workforce training policies and programs," according to the piece.

Pressers

None

Upcoming Votes

Wednesday

Questions or comments on Maven's Morning Coffee can be sent here.

 

blog comments powered by Disqus

Enjoy reading Represent!? You might like KPCC’s other blogs.

What's popular now on KPCC