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Kendrec McDade: Pasadena to withhold part of report on police shooting

In this undated family photo, Kendrec McDade, then a high school student, is seen wearing his Aztecs Football team uniform. McDade was shot and killed by Pasadena police after they received a false report of an armed robbery.
In this undated family photo, Kendrec McDade, then a high school student, is seen wearing his Aztecs Football team uniform. McDade was shot and killed by Pasadena police after they received a false report of an armed robbery. McDade Family File Photo

Pasadena has received an independent review of how police and the city handled the investigation of the 2012 officer-involved shooting death of Kendrec McDade, an unarmed African-American college student. But only portions of the report will be accessible to the public, a city spokesman said.

McDade was 19 when city police shot him at close range in a Pasadena alley. The officers were responding to a 911 emergency call from a man who falsely claimed he had been robbed at gunpoint. The man's laptop had been taken from his car while the owner had stepped away, but neither McDade nor the 17-year-old teen who admitted taking the computer had a gun.

The police, the District Attorney and the FBI investigated, all concluding that the officers should not be prosecuted. The latest report comes from Michael Gennaco of OIR Group, a private consulting company that analyzes officer-involved shootings for local governments.

City spokesman William Boyer said portions of the report that contain confidential personnel information would be withheld; but the rest, including the report's recommendations on police training and procedures, would be made public.

The report will be presented at the next meeting of Pasadena's Public Safety Committee of four city council members. The committee's Aug. 18 meeting was cancelled, so the next opportunity would be at the committee's regular Sept. 15 meeting or at some special meeting that could be called before that date.

The community is demanding that the new report be made public, said Dale Gronemeier attorney for the Pasadena chapter of the NAACP.

"They are waiting for a top to bottom review of what happened by a true independent, who is not seeking to place liability but is seeking to evaluate what happened, what went wrong, what went right," Gronemeier said.

Boyer said previous reports by the Police Department, the District Attorney's office and the FBI were more closely focused on the shooting itself. This city-commissioned report is more focused on police training and procedures.

"It isn't necessarily about the shooting itself," Boyer said. "It's about how the police department handled what happened after the shooting occurred."

This response does not satisfy Martin Gordon, coordinator of the Pasadena Community Coalition, one of several groups that has called for greater citizen oversight of the police.

"I don't care what the city wants, what are we legally entitled to? Give it to us, and tell us the truth," Gordon said.

Gordon and the NAACP attorney say they might have to go to court to get the full report.

 

 

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