Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Mayoral candidates pay for misleading mailer endorsements

COPS Voter Guide

COPS Voter Guide

The COPS Voter Guide is a familiar sight during election season. Candidates pay to appear in the mailer, which can give the misleading perception that law enforcement has endorsed them.

A familiar sight in voters’ mailboxes every election is the COPS Voter Guide, and this season the guide shows an endorsement for Eric Garcetti’s mayoral campaign. Which means LAPD cops back Garcetti, right? Wrong.

The COPS Voter Guide is one of several mailers candidates pay to appear in. In this case, the Garcetti campaign paid $75,000 to get on the mailer, according to records with the Ethics Commission.

The mail pieces can give the incorrect impression that a party or union is backing a candidate. The Los Angeles Police Protective League endorsed Wendy Greuel for mayor – not Garcetti – and has spent $246,000 on TV and radio ads in her favor.

The COPS Voter Guide is registered in the Northern California town of Folsom. On the group's website, director Kelley Moran touts "over 20 years of experience working with public safety," and says "The candidates we support have pledged to make public safety a top priority and work with law enforcement to protect our safety."

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DWP union attacks Eric Garcetti for treating every day at City Hall like Christmas

Eric Garcetti

Howard Pasamanick

A new attack ad accuses Councilman Eric Garcetti of living large on the city's dime. The Garcetti campaign says the ad is out of context and ignores similar actions by opponent Wendy Greuel.

The key to the good life – filled with lavish vacations and cars – is apparently as simple as getting elected to the Los Angeles City Council, according to a new attack ad from the union representing Department of Water and Power employees.

The TV spot from the independent political action committee, Working Californians, calls out mayoral candidate Eric Garcetti for allegedly treating every day at City Hall like Christmas. In fact, Garcetti’s voice provides the ad’s background music as he sings “White Christmas” at a convalescent home.

According to the ad, Garcetti stayed at five-star hotels while the city faced financial problems, drove seven city-owned cars, and cut fire services that led to slower 911 responses. In response, a spokesman for the Garcetti campaign noted that the trip cited in the ad was paid for by the city’s three proprietary departments – airport, harbor and DWP – which have budgets separate from the city.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: mayoral candidates fight over oil, Emanuel Pleitez makes a run for it, a new chapter in the fight over digital billboards

Mayor Race - Eric Garcetti

Grant Slater/KPCC

Wendy Greuel knocked Eric Garcetti Thursday for receiving $1.25 a year from an oil lease in Beverly Hills. The Garcetti campaign pointed out that money falls short of the donations Greuel has received from oil companies.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, public meetings and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Friday, March 1, and here is what's happening in Los Angeles:

Headlines

The LA Weekly doesn't seem too impressed with Wendy Greuel's attack on Eric Garcetti for receiving $1.25 a year from an oil lease with Venoco. "The attack bore the hallmarks of her campaign strategist, John Shallman, who has a track record of attacking opponents by linking them -- however tenuously -- to the oil industry," writes the Weekly.

Emanuel Pleitez is running -- literally -- for mayor, reports KPCC. The candidate plans to run 100 miles in the days leading up to the election.

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Unions bankroll independent campaigns in LA primary races

Wendy Greuel

Wendy Greuel Campaign

Los Angeles employee unions are spending millions to independently support Controller Wendy Greuel's run for mayor.

Los Angeles public employee unions are showing their clout as they pour millions of dollars into independent campaigns that are backing candidates in Tuesday's primary elections for mayor and other city offices.

Political action committees have spent more than $4 million to support candidates in the L.A. races for mayor, city attorney, controller and eight city council districts.

It nearly matches the $4.28 million that independent groups spent in the entire city election —  primary and runoff — in 2005, which is the last time open seats were contested for both council and mayor.

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Emanuel Pleitez sprints to the finish in long-shot run for Los Angeles mayor

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez sprints through the streets of Pico-Union. The former tech executive will run 100 miles through the streets of Los Angeles in the final week of his campaign.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez shakes hands with the daughter of a voter in Pico-Union.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Volunteers make phone calls at Pleitez campaign headquarters in Boyle Heights.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez works in his Boyle Heights headquarters on Valentine's Day. The flowers are for his wife Rebecca.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Boyle Heights residents pass by Pleitez campaign headquarters on East Cesar Chavez Avenue.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez tries to catch a breath mint tossed in the air by his wife Rebecca before a candidate forum at the Autry National Center.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Zoe Kipping of Sacramento works on the Pleitez campaign in it's Boyle Heights headquarters. She worked for Obama for America for eight months before joining the LA mayoral race.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Pleitez prepares for a television interview with a local Spanish-speaking news station at his headquarters in Boyle Heights.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez speaks with Javier, a mechanic who lives in Pico-Union.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Pleitez prepares to surprise his wife, Rebecca, with flowers for Valentine's Day.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez speaks with voters outside an apartment building in Pico Union.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Bella, 5, jumps rope outside her house in Pico-Union while mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez speaks with voters on the sidewalk.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez speaks with voters outside an apartment building in Pico Union.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez approaches a house that his staff has identified. A target voter lives inside.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral candidate Emanuel Pleitez fist bumps with a Sabaq. Pleitez has focussed on canvassing poorer, Latino neighborhoods since his campaign started in July.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Mayoral andidate Emanuel Pleitez speaks with residents in Pico-Union during a canvass on February 14.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Pleitez campaign field director Alberto Avalos speaks with a voter outside the candidate's headquarters in Boyle Heights.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Volunteers make phone calls at Pleitez campaign headquarters in Boyle Heights.

Emanuel Pleitez Profile

Grant Slater/KPCC

Pleitez arrives at a candidate forum in Hancock Park with his wife, Rebecca (right) and campaign aide Jocelyn Sida.


The conventional wisdom in Los Angeles is that Emanuel Pleitez’s campaign for mayor is going nowhere. If so, it’s definitely going nowhere fast.

The 30-year-old former tech executive is spending his final days running for mayor performing a low-tech, high-speed publicity stunt designed to increase name recognition.

The week before election day, he will run 100 miles, snaking his way from the San Fernando Valley to San Pedro.

“We’ve got to get to as many voters as possible,” Pleitez said. “We’ve been doing this since July, and we’ve still got more voters to go. We count the hours in the campaign.”

Pleitez needs to shake a lot of hands to have a chance in the race. The two leading candidates have $4 million war chests and rosters of high-profile endorsements. Pleitez has neither.

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