Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: Mental health care in jails, new regulation for OC Water District, negotiations between UTLA and LAUSD

The Men's Central Jail in downtown Los A

ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Department of Justice will order a consent decree to oversee mental health care in L.A. County jails.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

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Today is Friday, Oct. 3 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

The U.S. Department of Justice is moving ahead with a consent decree to address mental health care in Los Angeles County jails, reports the Los Angeles Times. The plan would be overseen by a judge and would likely cost the county millions of dollars. "The federal government is saying that they're throwing ... their hands up. In other words, they've given you every chance to improve up, and you've failed to do so," said Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Councilman Huizar's harassment lawsuit, pensions in Stockton, where do Angelenos live?

City Council Los Angeles

Mae Ryan/KPCC

A sexual harassment lawsuit against Councilman Jose Huizar was dismissed after a settlement was reached. The city of Los Angeles will not have to pay any money toward the settlement.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Thursday, Oct. 2 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

A sexual harassment lawsuit filed against L.A. City Councilman Jose Huizar was dismissed without the city having to pay a settlement, according to the Los Angeles Times. An attorney for the councilman declined to say whether his client paid a private settlement to Francine Godoy.

A federal bankruptcy judge ruled Stockton may reduce its pension payments to retired employees in order to pay its creditors, reports KPCC. "At the heart of the debate is whether a city's promise to pay a pension to a public employee has a greater legal protection than any other contract a city might enter," according to the station.

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California public worker pensions not protected in bankruptcy, judge rules

San Bernardino City Council

Sharon McNary/KPCC

San Bernardino, which declared bankruptcy in 2012, is still working out its plan for emerging from bankruptcy.

In a blow to CalPERS, a federal bankruptcy judge has ruled that Stockton may reduce its pension payments to California's massive public pension system and use the money to pay other creditors.

It is a landmark finding that could resonate in bankrupt San Bernardino and in other debt-stressed California cities, prompting them to look to the bankruptcy courts to reduce pension obligations.

Bankruptcy Court Judge Christopher Klein ruled Wednesday that federal bankruptcy law permitted Stockton to reduce the $29 million Stockton pays each year to the California Public Employees Retirement System and use part of that money to pay other creditors.

At the heart of the debate is whether a city's promise to pay a pension to a public employee has a greater legal protection than any other contract a city might enter. Klein's ruling appeared to put  pension administrators like CalPERS on an equal footing with other creditors.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Governor vetoes ethics bill, Richard Riordan talks tenure, what does it mean to have transparency in government?

Governor Brown Declares Statewide Drought Emergency

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed an ethics bill this week that would have required more disclosure of campaign funds. The governor said it would have made existing laws too complicated.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Wednesday, Oct. 1 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed a bill that would have required politicians to disclose more information about campaign donations and would have reduced the value of gifts lobbyists could give to elected officials, according to the Sacramento Bee. The governor said it would make existing laws more complicated. "Some balance and common sense is required," Brown said.

KPCC's AirTalk spoke with former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan about his time in office. Riordan is promoting his new memoir.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Mayor Garcetti releases safe streets report, Tustin considers building a stadium, Ontario officials sue over airport control

L.A./Ontario International Airport

David McNew/Getty Images

In a new court filing, Ontario city officials claim Los Angeles airport reps have not fulfilled their promises to take a regional approach to air traffic and bring more business to Ontario.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 30 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

KPCC covers the CityLab2014 conference, which is focused on addressing problems in America's cities and urban centers.

A Daily News editorial supports Mayor Eric Garcetti's citywide minimum wage proposal but only if it's accompanied by business tax reform and other efforts to improve the region's economy. The editorial board also wants the mayor to veto a separate wage hike just for hotel workers. "It would help politically active organized labor by encouraging hotel owners to sign union contracts. It would not, however, help the economy of the entire city, and the size of the increase would create greater hardship for the affected businesses," per the paper.

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