Politics, government and public life for Southern California

UPDATE: Groups behind anti-Prop 30 donation revealed

Gov. Jerry Brown

Sharon McNary/KPCC

California Gov. Jerry Brown speaks in support of Prop. 30 at a rally of UCLA students on campus, Oct. 16, 2012

UPDATE 5:43 p.m.: After giving up an intense legal battle, the Arizona-based group Americans for Responsible Leadership has revealed the sources behind an $11 million donation it made to a campaign involved with two hot-button propositions on Tuesday's ballot.

California's Fair Political Practices Commission, which has been seeking the identity of the donors, says the money came from Virginia-based Americans for Job Security, through a second intermediary, the Arizona-based Center to Protect Patient Rights.

The FPPC is characterizing the tangled donation as a form of money laundering.

California Attorney General Kamala Harris says further investigation is “absolutely necessary”  to unearth any possible violations of civil or criminal laws.   

"It’s a bit outrageous for folks who are out of state to pour $11 million into California with the intent of manipulating the outcome," Harris said.

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Ads for Palm Springs Congressional race flood LA airwaves

Raul Ruiz and Mary Bono-Mack

KPCC and Stephen Shugerman/Getty Images

Republican incumbent Mary Bono-Mack and her Democratic opponent, Raul Ruiz, have been buying ad time in both the Palm Springs and L.A. TV markets.

Seen enough political ads? The glut has been added to by a Congressional candidate who is running TV spots in L.A. — far away from her Coachella Valley district. 

You’d expect ads from Republican incumbent Mary Bono Mack to show up on TV stations in Palm Springs — the heart of her district. But they’re also showing up on L.A. stations, where the cost of a commercial is anywhere from five to ten times as expensive.

Alison Hendrix, general sales manager at Palm Springs station KMIR, says this has been the busiest — and most expensive — political ad season in her memory.  But she says her station didn't sell all its available airtime. TV stations, Hendrix says, are "like the airline industry" —  there's always a spot available for someone willing to pay the price.

But the Bono Mack campaign decided to spend their extra money on TV ads in L.A.

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That's My Issue: Immigration

TMI Adam Edgerly

Amy Lieu/KPCC

Adam Edgerly talks to KPCC about his thoughts on immigration. He is concerned about justice, respect and dignity regarding the issue.

This post is part of KPCC & WNYC's "That's My Issue" series, and represents the views of its author, not of either station. 


There is this ignoring of the immigration problem and barking back and forth at each other without coming up with compromised solutions that actually allow people to be here legally and yet don’t put undue burdens on our education system, on our hospitals. 

The Federal government controls the border and who gets to come in, but local governments have to bear the burden of the expense, and corporate interests gain from having cheap labor, but they don’t have to provide the healthcare and the education.

I think you have to treat people with respect and dignity. That means they need to be able to be here legally.

I have a lot of friends who are here from a wide variety of countries. I pastor a church of fifteen to sixteen ethnic groups alone in our congregation. Not to mention, anybody living in Los Angeles or in California, you’re affected by the wave of immigration because you are in relationship with people who are documented as well as undocumented.

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Forget Prop 32, Costa Mesa’s Measure V is the real union fight

Labor unions are spending upwards of $70 million to defeat California’s Proposition 32.  But they’re spending more per voter to stop another anti-union measure in Orange County.

Organized labor and its supporters are spending nearly $500,000 to defeat Measure V in Costa Mesa.  That’s about $8.50 per registered voter, compared to $3.80 against Prop 32.

Why?

Measure V, placed on the ballot by conservative members of the City Council, would change Costa Mesa from a general law city to a charter city governed by its own constitution.  The switch would free Costa Mesa from state laws that limit its ability to privatize jobs.  Labor unions worry that other cities would follow suit.

“One of our biggest concerns is that it would spread to other cities,” said Jennifer Muir, assistant general manager of the Orange County Employees Association.

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That's My Issue: The youth vote

TMI Chloe Groome, Youth Vote

Amy Lieu/KPCC

Chloe Groome, a UCLA student, talked with KPCC about the youth vote.

This post is part of KPCC & WNYC's "That's My Issue" series, and represents the views of its author, not of either station. 


There’s a lot of issues that matter to me on an individual basis, but the thing that I think is most important, overall, is getting young people to vote.

There’re a lot of issues in California right now that are going to come down to a few thousand votes. So, I just feel that it’s just really important for young people to get their voice out there and realize that their vote matters.

I pay attention to politics, and I know that politics matters on an individual level. The personal is political. And so, in my own life, I try to make other people realize that their decisions matter and that voting matters.

I’m young myself. I want to see my interests represented. 

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