Politics, government and public life for Southern California

One-third of Asian-American likely voters are undecided on presidential pick

Asian-American voters

Data: National Asian American Survey

Nearly one-third of likely voters who are Asian-American remain undecided about their choice for president, according to a new survey. But among those who express a favorite, they strongly prefer President Barack Obama to former Gov. Mitt Romney.

The independent, non-partisan National Asian American Survey interviewed a representative sample of more than 3,300 people for what the authors describe as the most comprehensive portrait of Asian-American political views.

Asian-American voters who are undecided could make a critical difference in the presidential election in the battleground states of Nevada, North Carolina and Virginia, said study co-author Karthick Ramakrishnan, an associate professor of political science at UC Riverside.

Asian-Americans interviewed about top issues showed strong preferences for Obama's stances on women's rights, health care and immigration, and were about equally split in support for Obama's and Romney's ideas on how to deal with the budget deficit.

A few numbers from the survey:

32 percent -- Asian-American likely voters who are undecided. (In the general population, about 7 percent are undecided)

25 percent -- Congressional districts where more than five percent of voters are Asian-American

45 percent -- Asian-American citizens who can be described as "likely voters"

15 percent -- California's Asian-American population

51 percent -- Asian-American voters who are non-partisan

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Maven's Morning Coffee: DWP salaries, pension reform at City Hall, helicopters swoop over Carmageddon

Mercer 4443

nixhorizon/Flickr cc

A new analysis of the Department of Water and Power finds salaries there are higher than at other public and private utilities.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, public meetings and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

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Today is Tuesday, Sept. 25, and here is what's happening in Los Angeles:

Headlines

Farmers Field moves ahead, as AEG's President Tim Leiweke tries to explain the timing and implications of the company's sale. Los Angeles Times/ Daily News/ Downtown News/ KPCC/ ESPN / Which Way, LA?

A consulting report finds the Department of Water and Power's salaries are significantly higher than those paid at other public and private utilities, reports the Los Angeles Times. The head of DWP argues that investing in energy efficiency would be a more effective way to save the utility money. Later today, the L.A. City Council will look at increasing the DWP's rates.

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City attorney candidates agree to debate....a lot

trutanich

Roberto (Bear) Guerra/KPCC

Assemblyman Mike Feuer is running for city attorney and he wants to hold 10 debates with incumbent Carmen Trutanich. Trutanich responded that 10 debates aren't enough.

State Assemblyman Mike Feuer challenged incumbent City Attorney Carmen Trutanich to ten debates today in the race to be L.A.'s top prosecutor. Trutanich’s response: Why not dozens? After Trutanich upped the ante, Feuer agreed to debate "as many times as possible."

Feuer first issued a statement this morning, challenging Trutanich to ten debates before the March 2013 primary election. 

“It’s an election about the future of public safety, our neighborhoods, our economy and the overall quality of life for every Los Angeles resident," Feuer said. "As such, it’s critical that voters have an opportunity to learn about the candidates’ experience, perspectives on key issues and vision for the office of City Attorney,” he said. 

In response, Trutanich called the proposal “unsatisfactory.”

“I foresee the need for dozens of debates to fully flesh out Trutanich’s lengthy record of achievements and to talk to all the communities in Los Angeles who have been so well served by Trutanich during the last four years,” said the city attorney’s chief strategist, Rick Taylor. “Perhaps ten is enough debates for Feuer. But we’ll need a lot more to tell our story and reach all communities.” 

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VIDEO: Taking dinner table conversation about politics on tour with 'Bring It To The Table'

Kitty Felde/KPCC

Filmmaker Julie Winokur is asking people across the country to "Bring It To The Table" and talk politics.

It was a conversation with her 17-year-old son that started filmmaker Julie Winokur on her cross-country tour. “He called me the most intolerant person he had ever met.” 

Winokur shrugged off the accusation, saying he just hadn’t lived long enough to know enough intolerant people. He told her, “if you don’t agree with people politically, you don’t even listen to what they have to say. You just dismiss it without even hearing.” That stopped her in her tracks.

Winokur makes videos for Talking Eyes Media, a San Francisco company now located in New Jersey.  Its clients include the James Irvine Foundation. She decided she needed to practice listening to people. So she packed up a folding table, a cameraman and a camera and hit the road.

Bring It To The Table - The Trailer from Talking Eyes Media on Vimeo.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: LAPD settlement, LAFD gets motorcycles, AEG's big day at City Hall

LAPD

Andres Aguila/KPCC

A gang member who was shot and paralyzed by LAPD officers will receive a $5.9 million settlement, a judge decided Friday.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, public meetings and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Monday, Sept. 24, and here is what's happening in Los Angeles:

Headlines

In Rick Orlov's Tipoff column, plans to privatize the Convention Center and Los Angeles Zoo are put on hold and local Democrats work to get out the vote.

A Los Angeles judge has ordered the city to pay $5.7 million to a man who was shot and paralyzed by Los Angeles police officers, reports the Los Angeles Times. The Los Angeles City Council had previously rejected a $4.5 million settlement offer in the case. "If the city has to pay some more to show that we stood up and supported our police officers when they did nothing wrong then so be it," said Councilman Paul Krekorian.

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