Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Eric Garcetti plays mayor of Los Angeles on the big screen

Eric Garcetti

Eric Garcetti campaign

L.A. City Councilman Eric Garcetti is running for mayor, and he's playing the mayor of Los Angeles in the new film "End of Watch."

Los Angeles City Councilman Eric Garcetti wants to be mayor so badly that he’s playing the role in a movie — seriously.

Garcetti appears as the mayor of Los Angeles in the new film, “End of Watch,” which stars Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Peña as LAPD officers who “patrol the meanest streets of south central Los Angeles,” according to the film’s website. (On IMDB, Garcetti is listed as playing himself.)

Anyone who donates $50 or more to Garcetti’s campaign by noon on Saturday will be eligible for a chance to attend a screening of the film with the councilman and Gyllenhaal, who has donated to Garcetti's campaign. 

It’s not the first time Garcetti has played mayor of Los Angeles. A year ago he popped up on TNT’s “The Closer.” The councilman's father, former District Attorney Gil Garcetti, is a consulting producer on the series. Of course, when Eric Garcetti was city council president, he got to be the acting mayor – for real – whenever Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa was out of town. 

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Maven's Morning Coffee: LAUSD evaluations, LA's identification cards, Walmart releases a video

LAUSD

Tami Abdollah / KPCC

The Los Angeles Unified School District approved a plan that will include student achievement in principals' evaluations.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, public meetings and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 12, and here is what's happening in Los Angeles:

Headlines

The Los Angeles Unified School District approved a proposal that will look at student achievement when evaluating principals, reports the Los Angeles Times. "We believe this will give a broad picture of the school and help administrators as school leaders in working with teachers," said the president of Associated Administrators of Los Angeles.

KPCC looks at how cities can issue identification cards for undocumented immigrants. City Councilman Richard Alarcon is proposing that Los Angeles take on this type of program, but Councilman Mitch Englander tells the Daily News he thinks the whole thing is "ludicrous."

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Bill Rosendahl returns to City Hall two months after cancer diagnosis

Betsy Annas/City of LA.

L.A. City Councilman Bill Rosendahl (second from the left) returned to City Hall Tuesday for the first time since being diagnosed with cancer. The councilman has lost about 45 pounds due to the treatment. From left to righ are Councilman Paul Koretz, Councilman Rosendahl, Councilman Tom LaBonge and Councilman Ed Reyes.

City Councilman Bill Rosendahl

Andres Aguila/KPCC

Seen here in a file photo, L.A. City Councilman Bill Rosendahl returned to City Hall Tuesday for the first time since being diagnosed with cancer. The councilman has lost about 45 pounds due to the treatment.


Two months after he was diagnosed with cancer, Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl returned to City Hall Tuesday with a pledge to run for a third term of office.

Rosendahl, 67, entered the chamber with the aid of a walker. After 13 radiation treatments and two chemotherapy sessions, the councilman has lost 45 pounds. It was only in recent days that his strength returned, he told reporters. He will go through another round of chemo next week. 

“I feel strong enough not only to serve a third term, but my goal is to live until 96 and when I’m getting all this love...you know, God is love,” Rosendahl said.

Up until now, the councilman has not disclosed what type of cancer he is battling. The cancer is of the ureter, which is a tube that connects the kidney and bladder. The councilman has a tumor between his fourth and fifth vertebrae and another tumor between the third and the fourth vertebrae, he said.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: LA's identification cards, Villaraigosa to Iowa, Convention Center costs escalate

Mercer 7557

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

The Los Angeles City Council is considering a proposal to issue identification cards that would allow illegal immigrants to open bank accounts.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, public meetings and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 11, and here is what's happening in Los Angeles:

Headlines

The city of Los Angeles is considering a plan to provide library cards that illegal immigrants could use as a form of identification, reports the Los Angeles Times. The cards would allow residents to open bank accounts, but they could not be substituted for a driver’s license.

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa will give the keynote address at the Jefferson Jackson Dinner in Des Moines next month, reports the Associated Press. Five years ago, Barack Obama and the entire Democratic presidential field attended the dinner.

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The presidential race has gone to the birds

Reddish Egret

Chuck Almdale

Obama: The elegantly plumed Reddish Egret, photographed at Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve, is noted for its dancing maneuvers when searching for food.

Eastern Kingbird

Susan Gilliland

Romney: The Eastern Kingbird has a small colored crown patch of feathers. It sits upright on a perch surveying for prey, then swoops to catch it, returning to the perch.

Yellow-breasted Chat

Jim Kenney

Biden: The yellow-breasted Chat, photographed at Malibu Lagoon, is the largest and noisiest of the American Wood Warbler family.

Merlin falcon

Lillian Johnson

Ryan: The Merlin falcon, photographed at Malibu Lagoon, preys on pigeons.


Chuck Almdale of North Hills has long been part of KPCC's Public Insight Network of sources we turn to with our political questions. He's also a bird enthusiast and a great source on all things avian.

So I asked him: which Southern California birds best portray the presidential candidates and their running mates — and why?

He conferred with fellow birders Ed Stonick and Tom Leskiw and came up with these profiles:

President Barack Obama: The Reddish Egret Egretta — An elegantly plumaged bird, it darts and dashes through the watery shallows when searching for food, rapidly spreading its wings as a canopy over its head. This not only enables it to better see its prey, but small fish are sometimes attracted to the "shade" the wings provide. This fastidious bird pays close attention to the details.

Vice President Joe Biden: Yellow-breasted Chat Icteria virens — The largest and noisiest of the American Wood Warbler family, the chat is always going on about something-or-other. More often heard than seen, he moves through the underbrush and tree canopies, chattering away endlessly. 

Mitt Romney: Eastern Kingbird Tyrannus tyrannus — The kingbird group of New World Flycatchers all have a small colored crown — a patch of feathers on the top of their heads. These feathers — usually hidden — are erectable when the bird feels like it, which is either in courting or threat displays. They sit very upright and motionless on a perch until they see a nice juicy insect go flying by, then they capture it and return to their perch.

Paul Ryan: Merlin Falco columbarius — This small falcon used to be called the "Pigeon Hawk," for its skill at swooping — with the blinding sun behind him — down on a plump pigeon. No remorse for the parasitic pigeon, who expects home and food supplied by society and not only gives nothing in return, but poops all over everything.

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