Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: Autopsy of Ezell Ford, Democrats court Latino voters, Antonio Villaraigosa returns to public eye

US-POLITICS-VILLARAIGOSA

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

The Sacramento Bee catches up with former L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

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Today is Tuesday, Dec. 30 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Politico looks at how the Democratic Party plans to court Latino voters in 2016. Leading that effort will be Rep. Tony Cardenas from the San Fernando Valley. "It was really bad timing for some senators who approached the president and asked him to put off taking executive action on immigration. Talking to Latinos, a lot of them were very bothered, a lot of them were very perplexed and confused," said Cardenas, who is the incoming chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus’s PAC.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Henry Waxman retires, LAPD goes on alert, Long Beach prepares for 2015

Representative Henry Waxman

CHRIS KLEPONIS/AFP/Getty Images

Rep. Henry Waxman leaves office after 40 years in Washington, D.C.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Monday, Dec. 29 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

After 40 years in Washington, D.C., Rep. Henry Waxman is retiring from Congress. "Waxman's fingerprints are on some of the most groundbreaking legislation to pass Congress in modern times. He led fights to strengthen safe water standards, create a generic drug market, put nutrition labels on packaged food, and his toughest sell: getting Congress to pass the Affordable Care Act," per KPCC.

The Daily News sat down with Mayor Eric Garcetti to review his work on the minimum wage, earthquake preparedness and his trade missions to Mexico and Asia. "I enjoy the job. Executive power allows you to make so much more change than being a legislator. You don’t have to study things for two years to get something done," Garcetti said.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Voter registration in Ventura County, preserving history in Long Beach, are there errors in LAPD crime stats?

Congresswoman Julia Brownley (D-Ventura)

Kitty Felde/KPCC

KPCC considers whether a voter registration campaign helped Rep. Julia Brownley win her November election.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Friday, Dec. 26 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

KPCC looks at how a voter registration campaign may have swung the November election in favor of Democrat Rep. Julia Brownley in Ventura County. Billionaire environmentalist Thomas Steyer spent $1 million to register Latino voters just prior to the election. "We basically gained a net 1,500 to 2,000 votes from that effort, and that's almost the margin of victory in this race," said Ben Tulchin, a pollster for the Brownley campaign.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Leading the Public Utilities Commission, Airbnb gets a lobbyist, Norma Torres goes to Congress

Airbnb'S Value Estimated At $10 Billion After New Round Of Investments

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Anticipating a fight in Sacramento, Airbnb hired a new lobbying firm.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Wednesday, Dec. 23 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Gov. Jerry Brown selected a former advisor to lead the California Public Utilities Commission, reports the AP. Michael Picker's appointment will require approval from state lawmakers.

The Los Angeles Times followed the Inland Empire's Rep. Norma Torres as she started her new position in Washington, D.C. "It's like drinking water from a fire hose. And I haven't been sworn in yet," Torres said.

Airbnb hired a prominent lobbying firm in Sacramento in anticipation of a legislative fight over the apartment-sharing service, reports the Sacramento Bee. The company will be with  KP Public Affairs. "A wide range of interest groups would have a stake in bills affecting Airbnb, among them the hotel industry, insurance companies, associations representing realtors or landlords and labor unions representing hotel workers," according to the newspaper.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Taser gets LAPD contract, veterans in San Bernardino pick up benefits, why can't riders charge their phones at Metro stations?

Police and body cameras

Joe Warner/South Jersey Times/Landov

The Daily News questions whether there was a conflict of interest in awarding a LAPD contract to Taser for body cameras.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Tuesday, Dec. 22 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

The Daily News questions whether the LAPD should have had a competitive bidding process before selecting Taser as its provider of body cameras. The company donated $84,000 to the department and police foundation in the past three years. "You have to use safeguards to make sure the money is being spent properly and no one is getting an unfair advantage," said Councilman Bernard Parks, a former chief of the department.

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