Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: LAPD backlog of fingerprints, possible jail time for Richard Alarcon, downtown's housing stock

US-CRIME-POLICE-INCIDENT lapd station

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

LAPD has an extensive backlog of unanalyzed fingerprints.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 10, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

The Los Angeles Police Department's backlog of unanalyzed fingerprints is so bad that some prints can no longer be used because a three-year deadline for prosecuting offenders has passed, reports the Los Angeles Times. "The reality is, at the current staffing, there are going to be cases … we are going to be unable to get to," said Deputy Chief Kirk Albanese.

Prosecutors want former L.A. City Councilman Richard Alarcon to spend 180 days in county jails in his perjury and voter fraud case, reports the Los Angeles Times. "Richard Alarcon is not remorseful. He remains utterly unrepentant," a deputy district attorney wrote in his sentencing memo. Sentencing is scheduled for today but the hearing is expected to be continued.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Renewed focus on homelessness, lessons from the LAPD, LA's mural ordinance

SKID ROW 008

Benjamin Brayfield/KPCC

Social services workers try to convince a homeless man to get off Skid Row and seek help around the corner at the Volunteers of America building. But it often takes many attempts to finally get someone to accept the services they need, Los Angeles Homeless Service's Authority employee Gabriel Jimenez said.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 9, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Former Mayor Richard Riordan wrote an article for Vice on what police in Ferguson, Missouri can learn from the LAPD. "While Ferguson may not have the resources of LA, change can and will happen if bold leaders approach these challenges with pragmatic, proven strategies that address injustice, empower both elected officials and citizens to act, and harness the economic might of the private sector," according to the piece.

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Vote for one candidate - several times: It could become legal in Santa Clarita elections

Voting booth

Sharon McNary/KPCC

A judge has cleared the way for Santa Clarita to adopt a new election system called 'cumulative voting' which allows voters to cast multiple votes for a single candidate.

Santa Clarita voters may become the first in California to elect city and community college officials by cumulative voting. The little-used system would allow voters to cast multiple votes for the same candidate. For example, in a City Council election to fill three seats, a Santa Clarita voter could cast three votes for just one candidate, or distribute votes to two or three candidates.

After hearing arguments on Monday, Superior Court Judge Terry Green approved cumulative voting in Santa Clarita city and the Santa Clarita Community College District. The ruling could help resolve lawsuits claiming violations of the California Voting Rights Act, according to attorney Kevin Shenkman. 

With cumulative voting, individuals who are part of a minority bloc of the population could amass their votes behind a single candidate and win a seat, Shenkman said. He represents two plaintiffs who had sued to eliminate the traditional at-large voting system used in Santa Clarita elections.  

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Gloria Molina to run for LA City Council, Debra Bowen opens up about depression, what happened to Republicans in Los Angeles?

Supervisor Gloria Molina

Andres Aguila/KPCC

Almost 25 years after she left City Hall, Gloria Molina is planning another run for the Los Angeles City Council. She will face Councilman Jose Huizar in the spring 2015 race.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Monday, Sept. 8, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

In Rick Orlov's Tipoff column, former Mayor Richard Riordan releases a book, Controller Ron Galperin focuses on data, and former Assembly Speaker Fabian Nuñez gets a new job.

Supervisor Gloria Molina will run for the Los Angeles City Council when she is termed out of office at the end of this year. She will run for the Fourteenth District seat against incumbent Councilman Jose Huizar. Los Angeles Times, KPCC, Daily News, LA Register

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Shootings in South LA, a vacancy on the Coastal Commission, the only debate in the governor's race

lapd los angeles police patrol car

Photo by Steve lyon via Flickr Creative Commons

South L.A. shootings in just the last week have left five dead and 10 wounded.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Friday, Sept. 5, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

This past week, South L.A. experienced a rash of shootings that left five dead and 10 wounded, reports the Los Angeles Times. "For it to be so violent so fast, it's shocking and scary. The young people are excited and they're ready to go to war. We're talking and they're not listening," one gang intervention worker told The Times.

A Daily News editorial suggests that Mayor Eric Garcetti's minimum wage proposal should be tied to business tax reform. "Improving economic conditions will require a full, public debate about more than the minimum-wage law. Mayor Garcetti’s proposal should start a wide-ranging discussion of what the city can do to lift both workers and employers," according to the piece.

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