Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: Gov. Brown hits the airwaves, LA considers a new minimum wage, why are water officials wasting water during California's drought?

Governor Brown Declares Statewide Drought Emergency

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Beginning today, Gov. Jerry Brown will appear in campaign television ads but they won't be for his reelection. Instead, he'll urge support for a $7.5 billion water bond and a rainy-day ballot measure.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Wednesday, Oct. 8 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Four members of the Los Angeles City Council want to increase the minimum wage to $15.25 per hour by 2019. That's a more aggressive approach than what Mayor Eric Garcetti announced back in September. "The $13.25 figure gets most families that are living underneath the poverty line just over the poverty line, but that’s still a precarious position," said Councilman Mike Bonin. KPCC, Daily News, Los Angeles Times

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Mayor Garcetti's Back to Basics, a Republican candidate's appeal to independents, what does Prop 45 mean for voters?

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Benjamin Brayfield/KPCC

The Los Angeles Times says Mayor Eric Garcetti's slow and steady "back to basics" approach is working at City Hall.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Monday, Oct. 6 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

In Rick Orlov's Tipoff column, Controller Ron Galperin looks at the city's spending and California considers how much it could make by legalizing marijuana.

Los Angeles Times writer Jim Newton declares Mayor Eric Garcetti's "Back to Basics" approach is working at City Hall. "It seemed to some — including me — that this approach, while important, also allowed him to duck larger challenges of leadership in favor of smaller, easier-to-achieve management practices. Fifteen months later, you have to hand it to Garcetti: His way is working," according to the piece.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Mental health care in jails, new regulation for OC Water District, negotiations between UTLA and LAUSD

The Men's Central Jail in downtown Los A

ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Department of Justice will order a consent decree to oversee mental health care in L.A. County jails.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Friday, Oct. 3 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

The U.S. Department of Justice is moving ahead with a consent decree to address mental health care in Los Angeles County jails, reports the Los Angeles Times. The plan would be overseen by a judge and would likely cost the county millions of dollars. "The federal government is saying that they're throwing ... their hands up. In other words, they've given you every chance to improve up, and you've failed to do so," said Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Councilman Huizar's harassment lawsuit, pensions in Stockton, where do Angelenos live?

City Council Los Angeles

Mae Ryan/KPCC

A sexual harassment lawsuit against Councilman Jose Huizar was dismissed after a settlement was reached. The city of Los Angeles will not have to pay any money toward the settlement.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Thursday, Oct. 2 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

A sexual harassment lawsuit filed against L.A. City Councilman Jose Huizar was dismissed without the city having to pay a settlement, according to the Los Angeles Times. An attorney for the councilman declined to say whether his client paid a private settlement to Francine Godoy.

A federal bankruptcy judge ruled Stockton may reduce its pension payments to retired employees in order to pay its creditors, reports KPCC. "At the heart of the debate is whether a city's promise to pay a pension to a public employee has a greater legal protection than any other contract a city might enter," according to the station.

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California public worker pensions not protected in bankruptcy, judge rules

San Bernardino City Council

Sharon McNary/KPCC

San Bernardino, which declared bankruptcy in 2012, is still working out its plan for emerging from bankruptcy.

In a blow to CalPERS, a federal bankruptcy judge has ruled that Stockton may reduce its pension payments to California's massive public pension system and use the money to pay other creditors.

It is a landmark finding that could resonate in bankrupt San Bernardino and in other debt-stressed California cities, prompting them to look to the bankruptcy courts to reduce pension obligations.

Bankruptcy Court Judge Christopher Klein ruled Wednesday that federal bankruptcy law permitted Stockton to reduce the $29 million Stockton pays each year to the California Public Employees Retirement System and use part of that money to pay other creditors.

At the heart of the debate is whether a city's promise to pay a pension to a public employee has a greater legal protection than any other contract a city might enter. Klein's ruling appeared to put  pension administrators like CalPERS on an equal footing with other creditors.

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