Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: Budgets for LA County and city, UTLA looks to get a new president, an endorsement in the sheriff's race

cash money bills

Photo by JasonUnbound via Flickr Creative Commons

Los Angeles County and city released their spending plans for fiscal year 2014-15, which starts on July 1.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Tuesday, April 15, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Mayor Eric Garcetti's first budget calls for modest improvements in city services and outlines a path toward reducing the city's business tax. "While we have many highlights, this budget represents a transitional year," the mayor said. KPCC, Daily News, Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles County's $26.1 billion budget includes more than 1,300 new jobs in the Department of Health Services, reports KPCC. The move is intended to help the county prepare for an influx of newly insured patients under the Affordable Health Care Act.

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LA County budget proposes hiring hundreds of nurses, social workers

AP

LA County's decision to restore a cross to the depiction of the San Gabriel Mission on its official seal is being challenged by the ACLU.

LA County CEO Bill Fujioka released his proposed 2014-15 budget Monday. The $26.1 billion plan includes 1,345 new jobs.


Thanks to increased sales and property tax revenues, Los Angeles County CEO Bill Fujioka Monday proposed a $26.1 billion dollar budget that includes 1,345 new jobs. The Department of Health Services would see the bulk of them.

737 new nurses and support staff would replace part time RN’s hired by the county on a daily basis, said Chief Nursing Officer Vivian Branchick.  “When you have your own employees, they have more commitment to patients,” she said.

Fujioka conceded hiring so many full time county nurses is a significant shift in policy. But he said the move is designed to help LA County compete for newly insured patients under the Affordable Care Act. About 300,000 people currently enrolled in county healthcare programs have the option of selecting a provider other than LA County.

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LA Mayor Garcetti's budget seeks to lower business tax, boost basic city services (updated)

LA Mayor Eric Garcetti

Kitty Felde/KPCC

Mayor Eric Garcetti released his first budget Monday, which seeks to reform the city's business tax and beef up some basic city services.

The first budget released by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti seeks to reform the city's business tax while simultaneously boosting basic city services, like road repairs and library hours. 

The $8.1 billion spending plan, which would take effect on July 1, first requires approval from the Los Angeles City Council. Budget hearings are scheduled to start on April 29. Neither council President Herb Wesson nor budget chair Councilman Paul Krekorian had any comment on the spending proposal. (Read the full budget and a summary below.)

"While we have many highlights, this budget represents a transitional year," Garcetti said. "We're making a down payment on our future and so, this first year the gains will be modest."

The Mayor's Office focused not just on numbers in the 2014-15 budget, but on the performance metrics attached to it.

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Maven's Morning Coffee: Reforming LA County's fundraising rules, seismic safety grades for LA, mapping the region's bike crashes

Ken Scarboro/ KPCC

Candidate Bobby Shriver says Los Angeles County's campaign finance laws unfairly punish candidates who self-fund their races.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Monday, April 14, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

In Rick Orlov's Tipoff column, reaction to the 2020 Commission and the Los Angeles City Council enjoys 41 days of vacation.

Supervisorial candidate Bobby Shriver wants an overhaul of Los Angeles County's campaign finance laws, reports the Los Angeles Times. Shriver says the current rules punish candidates who self-fund their campaigns. "New leadership could usher in changes on a number of policy fronts in the county, including how political spending is regulated," per the Times.

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Garcetti and 2020 Commission: At odds over state of the city?

Frank Stoltze/KPCC

Mayor Eric Garcetti didn't have anything to say about the 2020 Commission's report in his State of the City speech.

L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti gave his State of the City address Thursday night, but he conspicuously left out any mention of the blue ribbon commission that released a set of recommendations just one day prior on how to address some of the city's problems. 

The 2020 Commission was formed last year, just before Garcetti was elected mayor. He didn't mention the group's report during his speech at the California Science Center. Unless you count this: "The challenges we face are not new. We don't need a new diagnosis."

It was hard to ignore the timing of the commission's report, on the eve of the mayor's first State of the City address. One of the group's co-chairs, Austin Beutner, said the timing was a coincidence, and that he wasn't surprised by the mayor's inattention.

"Well, it's early," said Beutner, the city's jobs czar under former mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. "[The report's] a little superficial ... 20 pages. Some of the ideas take a little time to digest." 

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