Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: Governor vetoes ethics bill, Richard Riordan talks tenure, what does it mean to have transparency in government?

Governor Brown Declares Statewide Drought Emergency

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed an ethics bill this week that would have required more disclosure of campaign funds. The governor said it would have made existing laws too complicated.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Wednesday, Oct. 1 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed a bill that would have required politicians to disclose more information about campaign donations and would have reduced the value of gifts lobbyists could give to elected officials, according to the Sacramento Bee. The governor said it would make existing laws more complicated. "Some balance and common sense is required," Brown said.

KPCC's AirTalk spoke with former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan about his time in office. Riordan is promoting his new memoir.

Read More...

Maven's Morning Coffee: Mayor Garcetti releases safe streets report, Tustin considers building a stadium, Ontario officials sue over airport control

L.A./Ontario International Airport

David McNew/Getty Images

In a new court filing, Ontario city officials claim Los Angeles airport reps have not fulfilled their promises to take a regional approach to air traffic and bring more business to Ontario.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 30 and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

KPCC covers the CityLab2014 conference, which is focused on addressing problems in America's cities and urban centers.

A Daily News editorial supports Mayor Eric Garcetti's citywide minimum wage proposal but only if it's accompanied by business tax reform and other efforts to improve the region's economy. The editorial board also wants the mayor to veto a separate wage hike just for hotel workers. "It would help politically active organized labor by encouraging hotel owners to sign union contracts. It would not, however, help the economy of the entire city, and the size of the increase would create greater hardship for the affected businesses," per the paper.

Read More...

Maven's Morning Coffee: Injuries cost LA taxpayers millions, Neel Kashkari gets profiled, Orange County gives cold shoulder to ethics (updated)

Mercer 17751

Frank Stoltze/KPCC

A Los Angeles Times investigation finds the city of Los Angeles paid more than $300 million to injured firefighters and police officers over the past five years.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Monday, Sept. 29, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

In Rick Orlov's Tipoff column, Supervisors Zev Yaroslavsky and Gloria Molina get honored, Councilman Bernard Parks gives advice, and the LA Chamber makes a pilgrimage to City Hall.

A Los Angeles Times investigation found L.A. police officers and firefighters on an injury-leave program cost taxpayers $328 million over the past five years. The salaries those employees receive while on leave are tax-free, meaning the employees actually make more money than if they remained on the job. "Nineteen percent of L.A. police and firefighters took at least one injury leave last year, a rate significantly higher than those of other large local governments," per the Times.

Read More...

Maven's Morning Coffee: Supervisor Molina stops by AirTalk, audit on Board of Equalization headquarters, San Diego police pay out major settlement

California Stock Photo

roarofthefour/Flickr.com

A state audit finds the Board of Equalization should move out a building that's suffered from toxic mold, water leaks and plunging elevators.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Friday, Sept. 26, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

A state audit finds the Board of Equalization should move out of its headquarters, which have suffered from "water leaks, toxic mold, plunging elevators, corroded plumbing and falling exterior glass panels," according to the Sacramento Bee. "We believe there could be a net fiscal benefit for the state to move BOE staff to a new facility," said the state auditor.

L.A. County Supervisor Gloria Molina stopped by KPCC's AirTalk to discuss the lack of women in politics and her run for the Los Angeles City Council.

Read More...

Maven's Morning Coffee: New wages for hotel workers, a complaint about LAFD recruitment, a look at Jewish leadership in Los Angeles

City Hall

Orlando Contreras López/flickr Creative Commons

The Los Angeles City Council approved a new minimum wage for hotel workers Wednesday. It will be the highest minimum wage in the country will it takes effect next summer.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Thursday, Sept. 25, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

The Los Angeles City Council approved the country's highest minimum wage Wednesday for hotel employees. Beginning next summer, large hotels will have to pay their employees $15.37 per hour. Smaller hotels will be impacted starting in 2016. KPCC, Los Angeles Times, Daily News

Labor groups have created an independent expenditure campaign for Sheila Kuehl, who is running for the Board of Supervisors against Bobby Shriver, reports KPCC. The group has raised $362,000 from just five donations. A pro-business super PAC supported Shriver has raised about the same amount.

Read More...