Politics, government and public life for Southern California

Maven's Morning Coffee: LAFD's new chief, sheltering undocumented children in LA, marijuana farmers market shut down

lafd los angeles fire department

Photo by Eileen Rivard via Flickr Creative Commons

Assistant Chief Ralph Terrazas was named fire chief by Mayor Eric Garcetti Tuesday. His appointment is subject to approval by the L.A. City Council.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Wednesday, July 16, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

First Lady Michelle Obama will be in Los Angeles today, speaking about education and support for veterans, according to City News Service.

Assistant Chief Ralph Terrazas was nominated to be the next chief of the Los Angeles Fire Department. "I will dedicate our efforts on transforming the LAFD into a metric-driven, technologically sophisticated, community-focused organization that is reflective of the communities we serve," he said. KPCC, Daily News, Los Angeles Times

Read More...

Maven's Morning Coffee: LA's minimum wage, challenges in Long Beach, did Mayor Garcetti lose a tablet?

Employees prepare beverages in the first

GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images

A coalition of activists are pushing a ballot proposal that would increase wages in Los Angeles to $15/hour.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Tuesday, July 15, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

A coalition of activists have put forward a ballot measure proposal that would increase the minimum wage in Los Angeles to $15/hour. Supporters need to gather more than 61,000 signatures to get it qualified for an upcoming ballot. KPCC, Los Angeles Times

The Long Beach Press-Telegram outlines the challenges Mayor Robert Garcia and the new members of the city council will face: reducing pension costs, growing the middle class and strengthening the Port of Long Beach. "These issues will require a new level of creativity, some savvy negotiating skills and a strong vision of what’s needed to take this city forward," according to the newspaper.

Read More...

Maven's Morning Coffee: Mayor Garcetti speaks to teachers, picking sides in race for Board of Supervisors, police union rejects contract

Vice President Biden Addresses U.S. Conference Of Mayors In Las Vegas

Ethan Miller/Getty Images

A month after calling the Vergara court decision "great," Mayor Eric Garcetti told the American Federation of Teachers he's tired of politicians beating up on teachers.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Monday, July 14, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

In Rick Orlov's Tipoff column, the Richard Alarcon trial, light rail in the Valley, and addressing homelessness among veterans.

Last month, Mayor Eric Garcetti said he thought a court decision challenging teacher tenure laws was "a great decision." However, over the weekend, he told the American Federation of Teachers that he's "sick and tired of hearing our teachers get beat up on by political leaders in this country," according to the Los Angeles Times.

Read More...

Challenge kicks off Perez-requested recount in state Controller race

Richard Rios

Sharon McNary/KPCC

Richard Rios, an attorney with the Betty Yee campaign for state controller, reviews a ballot being recounted by hand at the Kern County Registrar of Voters office July 11, 2014.

Kern County Registrar of Voters

Sharon McNary/KPCC

A recount of votes in the state Controller's primary race begins in Bakersfield at the Kern County Regsitrar of Voters office

Kern County administration building

Sharon McNary/KPCC

The recount of votes in the state Controller's June 3 primary election began here, July 11, 2014, at the Kern County Registrar of Voters office

Kern County ballot box

Sharon McNary/KPCC

Votes in the state controller's primary race that are challenged by advocates for former Assembly Speaker John Perez or Board of Equalization member Betty Yee in a recount are stored here until the challenge is reviewed by the Kern County Registrar of Voters.

Shanta Lennon assists recount in Kern County

Sharon McNary/KPCC

Shanta Lennon normally works as an accountant in a Kern County office, but on July 11, 2014, she is assigned to sort ballots in advance of a recount at the Registrar of Voters. The controller's race ballots are being recounted.

Kern County Chief Deputy Registrar Karen Rhea

Sharon McNary/KPCC

Karen Rhea, chief deputy registrar for Kern County, oversees the recount of votes in the state Controller's race.

Karen Rhea, chief deputy registrar of voters, Kern County

Sharon McNary/KPCC

Karen Rhea, chief deputy registrar for Kern County, reviews recount procedures with Stephen Kaufman representing the Perez campaign, left, and Richard Rios of the Yee campaign.

Kern County ballot

Sharon McNary/KPCC

This is a stack of ballots being recounted July 11, 2014, in the Kern County Registrar of Voters office.


A  recount of ballots requested by John Perez, the third-place finisher in the state Controller's primary race, began Friday in Kern and Imperial counties.

Based on the first day's counting in the Kern County seat of Bakersfield, the recount could move at a glacial pace, frequently stalled by questions and challenges from lawyers and observers working on behalf of former Assembly Speaker Perez and his opponent Betty Yee.

She placed second in the controller's primary by 481 votes and if she retains that position after the recount, she would face Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin, a Republican, in the November general election.

Related: 8 reasons to care about the recount in the state controller's race

Before the first full Kern County precinct was counted,  Yee's lawyer challenged  a Perez vote.

Read More...

Maven's Morning Coffee: Extending the Metro Gold Line, reforming the state Legislature, protecting voting rights for disabled adults

California Budget

Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Historian DJ Waldie writes that Sacramento lawmakers are not serious about tackling ethics and good government reforms in the Legislature.

Good morning, readers. Welcome to the Maven's Morning Coffee -- a listing of the important headlines, news conferences, votes and announcements you need to know to fuel up and tackle your day.

The Maven's Morning Coffee is also available as a daily email. Click here to subscribe.

Today is Friday, July 11, and here is what's happening in Southern California politics:

Headlines

The Washington Post caught up with Mayor Eric Garcetti to talk about his first year in office. On his back to basics approach, the mayor said, "Well, it’s been tagged as low-key. I don’t believe it is. And I kind of dispel the narrative because it’s really actually quite wide-bandwidth and it’s quite fundamental and it’s been neglected."

Mayor Eric Garcetti, who also chairs Metro, supports extending the Metro Gold Line from Azusa to Claremont, according to the San Gabriel Valley Tribune. "I can’t do well for my city if I don’t have support all the way to the eastern border (of the county) and vice versa," Garcetti said.

Read More...