Reporting on health and quality of life in South LA

Baby boomer blues and how TV can affect sperm count: In health news today

watching tv

Detlef Reichardt/Flickr Creative Commons

A new study suggests that young men who watch at least 20 hours of TV weekly may have a sperm count that's 50 percent less than that of their counterparts who watch very little.

Staying fit through middle age could help significantly reduce the likelihood of your developing dementia or Alzheimer's disease by the time you're 65, says a new study. CBSNews.com reports that Alzheimer's is the sixth-leading cause of death in the U.S., killing nearly 84,000 yearly.

The BBC reports on new research that suggests living in a sunny climate may reduce a person's risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that mostly occurs in women. But researchers cautioned that people should not spend all day in the sun.

Baby boomers are living longer than their parents did – but not necessarily healthier. ABCNews.com says folks born between 1946 and 1964 are more likely than their predecessors were to have high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. They also have higher rates of obesity and physical inactivity.

Read More...

Doctor, patients: Rheumatoid arthritis is far more than joint pain

Richard Rudisill/iStockphoto.com

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that can cause painful inflammation in the joints. Because it is carried through the bloodstream, though, it can affect many other parts of the body, including vital organs.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a condition that debilitates but doesn't destroy – it hammers away with constant pain, but not so it's apparent to others.

That's why if you ask Kelly Young about rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.), she's quick to de-emphasize the "arthritis" part.

"Arthritis is one of the symptoms, but it's not the only symptom," she said. "It's a systemic disease."

Young founded the Rheumatoid Patient Foundation, the non-profit behind the first Rheumatoid Awareness Day, which took place on Saturday. The hope is to get people who are feeling R.A. symptoms to see a doctor now – and to get people with money to give some of it to R.A. research.

"The levels of research funding, federally, in the United States for this disease are much lower per patient than they are for comparable diseases," said Young.

Read More...