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Humans are warming climate, government researchers say

The U.S. government's most comprehensive climate report to date is at odds with the statements made by President Trump and his Cabinet.
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Recent Environment & Science coverage

LA breaks records for hottest Thanksgiving ever

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Downtown Los Angeles hit 92 degrees, a statistic that goes all the way back to 1877, when records began being kept.

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Could Redwood Friday be the new Black Friday?

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All California state parks with redwood trees are giving out free parking passes the day after Thanksgiving.

Adult siblings can make our lives healthier and happier

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Or they can make them hell.

Man who thinks the earth is flat will launch himself in a rocket he built in his own backyard

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"I don't believe in science. I know about aerodynamics and fluid dynamics... but that's not science, that's just a formula," says Mike Hughes.

Earth is lit, and that's a problem

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Over the last five years, global light pollution has increased nearly 10 percent, a new study shows, The fastest rise occurred in developing nations.

LA's weather will be hot and dry — just like your Thanksgiving turkey

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Gobble gobble GASP! We could see record heat on Thanksgiving, thanks in part to two high pressure systems.

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This fly dives into Mono Lake, but doesn't get wet

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Now scientists have figured out how the fly stays dry even though it can stay submerged for 15 minutes. Yet another otherworldly aspect of Mono Lake.

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More Environment & Science

Record-breaking heat forecast for Thanksgiving week

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Wednesday's high is forecast at 92 degrees, while Thanksgiving day is expected to top out at 90.

To save their water supply, Colorado farmers taxed themselves

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The recent drought in the West forced people to take a hard look at how they use water. In Colorado, some farmers tried an experiment: make their water more expensive without hurting business.

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FAA approves drone as 'cell phone tower in the sky' for Puerto Rico

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The aircraft is called the Flying COW, for Cell on Wings. Developed by AT&T, it can provide voice, data and Internet service for 40 square miles and up to 8,000 people at a time.

How to watch the Leonid meteor shower Friday night

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NASA's Paul Chodas recommends getting away from the city to watch the showers around midnight. Settle in, look east and be patient for the streaks of light to appear.

Live near an oil well? CARB wants to know what you breathe.

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A new state program will monitor air quality in neighborhoods near oil and gas facilities. But critics say it should lead to measurable improvements, not just more data.

The largest digital camera in the world takes shape

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A two-story tall, digital camera is taking shape in California. It will ultimately go on a telescope in Chile where it will survey the sky, looking for things that appear suddenly or change over time.

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US lifts ban on importing elephant trophies from Zimbabwe, Zambia

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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said hunting programs in those countries can aid conservation efforts. But those who oppose the policy change point to a decline in Zimbabwe's elephant population.

Keystone Pipeline oil spill reported in South Dakota

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The oil leak occurs just a few days before Nebraska state regulators will decide on the fate of TransCanada's controversial sister project, the Keystone XL Pipeline.

Watch: The hurricane season, as shown by salt, smoke and dust

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A NASA visualization uses computer models to show how recent hurricanes shifted salt from the Atlantic, dust from the Sahara and smoke from fires in Portugal and the Pacific Northwest.

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