Science & Environment | Exploring the intersection of urban life, science and the environment

Humans are warming climate, government researchers say

The U.S. government's most comprehensive climate report to date is at odds with the statements made by President Trump and his Cabinet.
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Recent Environment & Science coverage

Californians still use more water than the national average

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Californians cut way back on water consumption during the drought. But we still trail far behind many East Coast states.

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As climate shifts, California birds are nesting earlier

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As global temperatures continue to climb, animals have to adapt. For 202 different species of California birds, that means nesting earlier in the year.

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Did firefighters suffer toxic exposure in the Wine Country Wildfires?

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Researchers will take blood and urine samples from 200 firefighters to find out if they did.

3 tons of supplies are headed to the International Space Station

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An unmanned Antares rocket carrying 7,400 pounds of stuff blasted off from Wallop Islands, Virginia.

Schwarzenegger says climate activists should change their tactics

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The movie star and former California governor wants environmental activists to pay more attention to immediate health hazards like air and water pollution.

Are Instagram crowds ruining nature?

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When a particularly scenic shot gains traction on Instagram, visitors flood in. That can lead to permanent changes in the landscape.

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​PG&E says someone else's wires may have started deadly blaze

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PG&E said in a legal filing Thursday that a preliminary investigation suggests that a private power line may have started the blaze that killed 21 people and destroyed more than 4,400 homes in Sonoma County.

More Environment & Science

Want to breathe cleaner air? Move the bus stop

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Researchers conclude relocating bus stops away from intersections can dramatically cut the amount of vehicle emissions riders breathe.

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Officials in Los Angeles investigate spill at urban oil well

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The Los Angeles Times reports Wednesday that the spill — estimated to be from 20 to 40 barrels — was discovered Saturday. The cause is unknown.

Supervisors approve big dig at Devil's Gate Dam

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Local environmental groups had sued to limit the amount of sediment that could be removed and the amount of bird and wildlife habitat that could be torn out.

Slideshow

Exxon must turn over Torrance Refinery explosion documents

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But a judge's ruling let the company withhold other documents sought by federal investigators concerning a potentially deadly chemical used at the refinery

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Canyon Fires were caused by accidental shrub fire, wind-blown embers

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Canyon Fire scorched more than 2,600 acres in late September, and Canyon Fire 2 consumed more than 9,000 acres in early October.

Brown and De León talk climate change at the Vatican

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Two of California’s top elected officials are in Vatican City lobbying for international action on the environment

Meet the man who's trying to save every seed

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Long before the modern farm-to-table movement, gardener John Coykendall was on a mission to preserve rare heirloom seeds.

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LA, Long Beach ports approve plan to cut air pollution

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Among the plans: transitioning more trucks, cranes and cargo-handling equipment to electric and natural gas over the next 13 years.

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Scientists discover hidden space in Great Pyramid of Giza

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Researchers used equipment that detects muons. Measuring the density of the tiny particles yielded an image of what's behind the pyramid walls with no damage to the ancient structure.