Health | Covering health care and health policy in Southern California

A 'potentially powerful model' for treating sickle cell

A sickle cell clinic in South L.A. is believed to be the first of its kind: It brings primary and specialty care providers under one roof to treat the disease.
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Recent Health coverage

Dads can get postpartum depression, too — here's why

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New research links lower testosterone levels with male postpartum depression. A man's low testosterone may also mean less depression for his female partner.

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What to do when your health insurance won't pay the bills

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Insurers can reduce benefits or change how much they are willing to pay for services, but they are generally supposed to give customers 60 days' notice.

What are California's options to get universal health care?

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Advocates want state lawmakers to adopt a single-payer health care system. But that's not the only way to reach universal coverage. Here are the primary models.

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FDA approves drug for Chagas disease after Martin Shkreli's interest stokes fears

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U.S. doctors have long wanted FDA approval for a treatment that's common in Latin America. But when Martin Shkreli took interest, those doctors panicked — then mobilized.

How to help your doom and gloom teen reframe their thoughts

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Parents can play a huge role in helping teenagers develop a critical life skill: dialing back negative self-talk.

Refuge for abused kids to open in East LA

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With foster kids in Los Angeles experiencing high rates of homelessness, dropping out of school, and suicide, a new center aims to offer aid.

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Some parents may have found a loophole in California's vaccine law

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The law eliminated vaccine exemptions based on personal beliefs. After it took effect, the number of kindergartners with a medical exemption increased threefold.

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More Health

As California's stroke death rate climbs, here's how to spot the signs

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The rate started rising from 2013 through 2015 after more than a decade of decline. The CDC says most strokes are preventable, so it's critical to spot the signs.

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Why do patients undergo alternative, unproven treatments?

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Some people in Southern California try to avoid prescription medication. Others turn to alternative medicine after getting frustrated with Western medicine.

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IV hydrogen peroxide: Unproven and possibly dangerous

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Naturopathic doctors claim the therapy can help with everything from sinus infections to cancer. Experts say it's never been studied and shouldn't be used.

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Billions at stake for CA as CHIP deadline looms

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Congress has until the end of the month to renew funding for a special children's health insurance program. If it doesn't, California will have to come up with billions.

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Critics warn GOP budget threatens Californians' health

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As Congress works to pass a budget before Oct. 1, advocates for the state's poor warn cuts to food stamps or public housing could lead to higher medical costs.

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San Diego declares health emergency amid Hepatitis A outbreak

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The virus, which attacks the liver, has killed more than a dozen people and sickened hundreds of others in San Diego since November.

Has salt gotten an unfair shake?

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For years, we've been told that less salt is better. But some scientists say moderate salt intake is healthier for many people.

You might be able to delay treatment for thyroid cancer

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After five years, just 12 percent of people diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer saw their tumors grow by 3 millimeters or more, a study found. And in some people, the tumors shrank.

For poor drug users, Medi-Cal offers a fresh start

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Before this year, Medi-Cal covered only limited and episodic care. Now, it also pays for medications, inpatient beds, individual therapy and case managers.

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