Immigration & Emerging Communities

Comfort women in LA

Josie Huang/KPCC

Former 'comfort women' tour SoCal, call attention to WW II sex slavery

Two former 'comfort women' go on a U.S. tour, making their first stop in L.A. to show support for a controversial monument to war-time sex slaves in Glendale.

Rubio, seen here addressing the National Press Club in May, told NPR he'll decide on a presidential run in the next few months

Rubio: US cannot admit all children seeking asylum

Sen. Marco Rubio argued that the nation's immigration laws need to be overhauled and said that Hillary Clinton would be a flawed candidate for president.

Two young girls watch a World Cup soccer match on a television from their holding area where hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Nogales, Ariz. on June 18.

Health issues faced by immigrant kids not what you'd think

Politicians charge that the nearly 60,000 unaccompanied minors who've come to the U.S. could put the nation at risk for everything from TB to mumps. Health officials tell a different story.

Banc of California expansion opposed by advocates for minorities, low-income

Community groups want federal regulators to deny Banc of California’s bid to acquire 20 Popular Community Bank branches.

Poll: Recession may be over, but not for Latino families

In spite of the economic recovery, many Latino families aren’t confident about regaining their own economic footing.

In immigration news: Perry to deploy National Guard, flood of court cases, deferred action

Gov. Rick Perry has ordered 1,000 National Guard troops to the Texas-Mexico border. Courts flooded with cases of migrant children. Immigrants renewing deportation deferrals.

The costs migrant smugglers pay to get people from Mexico to US

Migration experts and smugglers who charge from $4,000 to $10,000 to move Central Americans to the U.S. say these are some of the payments that must be made.

'The Book of Unknown Americans': A novel about the immigrant story

When we talk about immigration, what's often lost are the stories of the real people who have come to this country in hopes of a better life: their aspirations, losses, frustrations and joys.

Deportation deferrals expiring, immigrants seek to renew status

Deportation deferrals are good for two-years – and starting to expire next month. Immigrants under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals must reapply or lose this special status.

Americans really like Jews. Muslims and atheists? Not so much

A new Pew poll asked how warmly respondents felt toward people of varying religious groups. The answers varied with race, age and political leanings — and not all the feelings were mutual.

In immigration news: Protests, funding for the border crisis, new GOP demands

Hundreds of anti-illegal immigration protests to take place nationwide Friday and Saturday. Republicans hold back from granting Pres. Obama's $3.7 billion to deal with border crisis. Calls to make it easier to deport more unaccompanied minors.

The trouble in Honduras that has children fleeing to the US

One city in Honduras is sending more child immigrants than any other in Central American. Why? An immigrant family talks violence in their homeland.

One senior's take on how her generation differs from Latino youths

Sara Hanan is separated from the children she reads to by age and race, but she sees hope in the country's future amid those differences.

OC history: Japanese-American site makes 'Most Endangered' list

Three generations of Japanese-Americans lived on the Huntington Beach property with a goldfish farm and the county's first Japanese Presbyterian Church. The current owners wants to demolish those buildings.

In immigration news: Border states, White House leak, hosting unaccompanied children

Residents in border states more likely to see immigration as top issue facing country. A testy public exchange between the White House and MD governor. State leaders consider housing unaccompanied children in their states.

How elder care changes when more nurses are Latino

When the growing number of white seniors need help, more of those nurses taking care of them will be Latino.