Have your views on end-of-life medical treatment changed?

LAKEWOOD, CO - SEPTEMBER 01:  Hospice volunteers caress the hands of terminally ill patient Annabelle Martin, 95, as her health quickly declined at the Hospice of Saint John on September 1, 2009 in Lakewood, Colorado. The non-profit hospice, which serves on average 200 people at a time, is the second oldest hospice in the United States. The hospice accepts patients regardless of their ability to pay, although most are covered by Medicare or Medicaid. End of life care has become a contentious issue in the current national debate on health care reform.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Annabelle Martin
LAKEWOOD, CO - SEPTEMBER 01: Hospice volunteers caress the hands of terminally ill patient Annabelle Martin, 95, as her health quickly declined at the Hospice of Saint John on September 1, 2009 in Lakewood, Colorado. The non-profit hospice, which serves on average 200 people at a time, is the second oldest hospice in the United States. The hospice accepts patients regardless of their ability to pay, although most are covered by Medicare or Medicaid. End of life care has become a contentious issue in the current national debate on health care reform. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Annabelle Martin
John Moore/Getty Images

The conversation around how to deal with a late-stage illness is changing in the United States. 

According to new data from the Pew Research Center, a growing number of people in the United States are choosing to be significantly more aggressive in treating end-of-life illnesses. In fact, the study reports that the number of respondents who say a doctor should always do everything possible to save a life has doubled from 15 to 31 percent since 1990. Some 35 percent of adults said they would instruct their doctors to keep them alive, even if they were in significant pain or battling a disease with little chance of recovery. 

How, if at all, have your views changed? Why?

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