Philippe's celebrates 100 years in business

Hundreds if not thousands of people waited outside Philippe's in downtown Los Angeles on Monday. The home of the original French Dip celebrated its 100th birthday by offering the sandwich for its original price: ten cents. KPCC's Brian Watt spoke with a few of the participants in this milestone of Los Angeles history.

Hundreds if not thousands of people waited outside Philippe's in downtown Los Angeles on Monday. The home of the original French Dip celebrated its 100th birthday by offering the sandwich for its original price: ten cents. KPCC's Brian Watt spoke with a few of the participants in this milestone of Los Angeles history.

Patty Goodwin: I've been coming since I was four years old. Yeah, I think it's just the environment itself. My grandparents came here when they were sweethearts, when they were in their 20s, when my grandfather came back from World War II, so, it's a lot of history.

William Hicks, Sr.: In the 1950s, I used to come here, eat breakfast or lunch. Because I worked for the county. I came here with friends many, many times, and it's always the same. Nobody puttin' on no airs, but they just treat everybody the same. You're sure to get what you ask for.

Sister Sean Patrice: My mother used to work for the Dodgers in the Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Willie Davis era. And she worked in accounting, and they would send her down here. The accounting department would send her down here to get lunch. Because it was pretty close. You hopped in the car and came down Sunset, and then came here, and they had lunch from Philippe's. This was back in the '60s.

City Councilman Tom LaBonge: When I was in high school, Burr Hickman was my teacher of English, at John Marshall high. He said come here, sandwiches were seventy cents. I've been coming ever since. It's a little bit higher now, but it's the greatest place. You see the cross section of Los Angeles. And there's no place in Los Angeles that more people mispronounce the name of the restaurant. I say "Phee lee-pays."

John Binder: I, it doesn't really matter how they pronounce it, as long as they come back and enjoy the place. But I'd say "Phee lee pee." And that's coming from a good German, so... (laughs)

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