Schools change Holocaust curricula

Events around the world today honor the millions of Jewish people killed by the Nazi government in Europe during World War II. KPCC’s Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports that some schools are changing their approach to this grim chapter in history.

Events around the world today honor the millions of Jewish people killed by the Nazi government in Europe during World War II. KPCC’s Adolfo Guzman-Lopez reports that some schools are changing their approach to this grim chapter in history.

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez:

Orli Kotkin: We read the book, The Terrible Thing, and it actually tells you about animals, it tells you about, it tells you about butterflies, it tells you about bunnies, and this terrible thing came and it took away all these bunnies and the butterflies.

Guzman-Lopez: Until only one bunny remained. Years ago, Kotkin says, the school took a protective approach and wouldn’t spell out the connection between this story and the Holocaust. She says some kids were too young to make the connection, and students who did get it didn’t know enough details to connect the Holocaust with other acts of genocide.

Kotkin: We feel like we can push to the point more at a younger age, from what we’ve seen. They haven’t gone home. They haven’t had nightmares.

Guzman-Lopez: Kotkin says other Jewish schools are making similar changes in their curricula.

Note: Some of Kotkin’s students plan to join thousands of people tomorrow for a Holocaust Remembrance event at L.A.’s Pan Pacific Park.

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