Barbara Boxer reflects on Scott Brown victory in Massachusetts

U.S. Republican Senate-elect Scott Brown from Massachusetts addresses the media January 20, 2010 at the Park Plaza Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts. Brown, a republican state senator, beat Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley in a special election to fill the seat of late Senator Edward M. Kennedy.
U.S. Republican Senate-elect Scott Brown from Massachusetts addresses the media January 20, 2010 at the Park Plaza Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts. Brown, a republican state senator, beat Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley in a special election to fill the seat of late Senator Edward M. Kennedy. Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Democrats are coming to terms with the victory of underdog Republican Scott Brown. He’ll fill the U.S. Senate seat the late Ted Kennedy held for almost half a century. California is as “blue” as Massachusetts, so some political observers wonder whether a Senate upset is just as possible here.

Democrat Barbara Boxer is seeking a fourth Senate term. What's her reaction to the Massachusetts upset?

"I think at the end of the day whether it’s Massachusetts or California, there’s one question that the voters have to answer: who is on their side and is going to fight for them every day. And that’s the question that we’re going to pose. And the answer, we believe the answer in our state will be to keep me representing the people ‘cause that’s what I do and that’s what I’ve done forever and what I want to continue to do and they will make that judgment."

But doesn't the national party see California as vulnerable if Massachusetts is vulnerable?

Boxer says, "every state is now in play. Absolutely. Both ways. There are pick up opportunities for the Republicans. There are pick up opportunities for us. But I want to make something clear to you, Kitty. Every one of my races has been really hard. So before Massachusetts results, after Massachusetts, it’s all the same for me."

Boxer raised close to $2 million by late last year. She has just over $7 million to spend in her re-election race. Her main GOP rival Carly Fiorina has more than $2.5 million in the bank. Most of that is a campaign loan from her own pocket.

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