Los Angeles officials re-evaluate future of Electric Daisy Carnival musical festival

Though city and police officials have said they will re-evaluate the future of the Electric Daisy Carnival in Los Angeles, organizers of the electronic music festival that drew an estimated 185,000 total of revelers over two days last week hope to come back.

Today event promoters are planning the next edition of this year's carnival, scheduled Aug. 28 in Puerto Rico. Before the two-day bash here in Los Angeles, organizers staged versions of the carnival in Denver on June 12 and Dallas on June 19.

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and Police Chief Charlie Beck voiced concerns Monday, one day after the fire department announced more than 200 medical emergencies were reported at this year's event, and more than 100 people were taken to area hospitals.

The comments from Beck and Villaraigosa also came after video of gate-crashers climbing over fences and tents to get inside the carnival area on Saturday was aired on television newscasts.

"We're going to have to assess whether or not these events will occur in the future," Villaraigosa told KCAL9 Monday.

Beck told KCAL9: "This year I think was the most impactful on public safety, so we have to look at limiting the event a little bit next year, but we'll work with the promoters on that."

Police made 65 arrests at the event on Saturday, KCAL9 reported.

Drug overdoses and drunkenness at the carnival held Friday and Saturday were a problem, according to the fire department.

Dr. Phil Fagan, who runs the emergency room at Good Samaritan Hospital, told Fox11 his doctors and nurses were swamped during the carnival.

"I think this is just a catastrophe waiting to happen," Fagan told Fox 11. "We have a hundred thousand people taking multiple drugs, anywhere from alcohol to methamphetamine, to cocaine, to MDMA to PCP. And something needs to be done to stop that availability.

"The fire department has to assume their responsibility. The hospitals have to assume their responsibility, and the people that put on the concert are taking the money and assuming no responsibility."

Fagan told Fox11 that promoters, if held accountable for all civil and criminal conduct at their events, would take effective actions to cut down on drug and alcohol use.

"I can flat tell you that if they had responsibility for all those kids, civil and criminal responsibility for what happens to all those people, this would stop very quickly," Fagan told Fox11.

Los Angeles Fire Department personnel reported 226 medical emergencies at the event, held at Exposition Park and the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, the department's Brian Humphrey said.

From those incident calls, 114 people were taken to hospitals, he said. There were no reports of fatalities, Humphrey said.

A message posted Sunday on promoter Insomniac's 14th Electric Daisy Carnival website for the Los Angeles events stated:

"Well, EDC2010 is in the books! It may sound cliche, but the truth is that we could not do this without the enthusiasm and support from every last one of you.

"Nothing makes us happier than seeing smiling, dancing people enjoying and sharing in the same vision that we do. Our goal is to create a journey, not just a mere concert experience and you have helped us to get there.

"Thanks so much - we'll see you next time!"

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