Well known Colton rapper loses bid to get removed from gang injunction

Rappers 40 Glocc & Ray J arrive at the Triumph Films' premiere of 'Zombie Strippers' on April 15, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.
Rappers 40 Glocc & Ray J arrive at the Triumph Films' premiere of 'Zombie Strippers' on April 15, 2008 in Los Angeles, California. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

A renowned rapper from the city of Colton has lost his bid to be removed from a San Bernardino County gang injunction that went into effect over a year ago.

Lawrence White, aka 40 Glocc, gained fame after signing a record deal with 50 Cent’s “G-Unit” record label. He’s recorded several albums as 40 Glocc and Big Bad 40 that are laden with violent paeans to thug life. He’s also had numerous cameos on records by Eminem and other rappers, but may be better known for his public taunting of better known rappers like Lil’ Wayne.

Four years ago, White told a hip-hop magazine that he’s still a Colton City Crip and no one can ever change that. But in court, the 35-year-old White says all the gang-banger bluster is just part of his act. San Bernardino County judge Judge Donald Alvarez says it’s an act to mask real criminal gang activity.

"Trial evidence shows that (White) did repeatedly act in concert with the Crips gang by trespassing repeatedly at the Arbor Terrace apartments and loitering with known gang members during the packaging and selling of drugs on the apartment complex premises," Alvarez said in his written ruling.

White will remain on an injunction barring members of the Colton City Crips from the Arbor Terrace apartments and a neighboring liquor store.

Authorities say both are hubs for drug dealing and other illicit activity controlled by the Crips. For 20 years, according to the San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Office, Crips claimed Arbor Terrace Apartments as its territory for drug sales, gambling and open recruitment of young potential gang bangers.

In a statement, the San Bernardino County D.A.’s Office said “although White was unable to shield his gang behavior with the First Amendment, the court made clear that the injunction does not operate to limit or curtail (his) other activities as related to his professional recording career.”

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