Electric car advocates offer ideas about where all those future plugs should go

The Nissan Leaf electric is seen during the press day of the LA Auto Show on Nov. 18, 2010.
The Nissan Leaf electric is seen during the press day of the LA Auto Show on Nov. 18, 2010. Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images

Last week Nissan delivered the first of its new LEAF plug-in cars to a northern Californian, and the company’s got 20,000 more orders coming off the line. Other companies with plug-in hybrid cars are following suit.

It’ll be a challenge, though, to put all those cars on the grid and build a network of outlets to juice them up. Plug-in advocates argue that the state's failure to meet that challenge 10 years ago delayed new technology for cars.

The California Plug-In Electric Vehicle Collaborative includes state and local agencies and industry groups that say they’ve got ideas for making things work more smoothly as more plug-in cars hit the road.

Those ideas include easing rules in condo and apartment buildings for chargers, figuring out off-peak rates for overnight juicing, and streamlining the process of applying for a home charging system at your local city hall.

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