Reward up to $100,000 for information in brutal beating at Dodger Stadium; prayer vigil planned

John Stow, the cousin of San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow, addresses the media on Tuesday, April 5, 2011, asking the public for any information leading to the Los Angeles Dodgers fans who attacked his cousin after a game last week.
John Stow, the cousin of San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow, addresses the media on Tuesday, April 5, 2011, asking the public for any information leading to the Los Angeles Dodgers fans who attacked his cousin after a game last week. Ashley Bailey/KPCC

Los Angeles officials and the Dodgers have upped the reward for information leading to the arrest of those involved in the brutal beating at Dodger Stadium.

Bryan Stow, a 42-year-old father from Northern California, has been in the hospital with severe brain injuries. He was wearing a rival Giants jersey and was attacked in the stadium parking lot after the opening day game.

LA Councilman Ed Reyes, whose district includes Dodger Stadium, says the reward is up to $100,000. Reyes says he and other city officials are meeting with Dodgers team officials Thursday to talk about policy changes to improve safety at the stadium.

“We need to capture that family environment,” Reyes says. “We need to have a system that speaks to those who use profane language, those who intimidate families, those who are drinking too much. Get them out of the stands, out of the stadium and essentially enhance our sense of security as we enjoy this great venue.”

Doctors say Stow remains in critical condition in a coma with damage to his skull and brain.

Community activists, clergy members and Stow’s family will gather Wednesday evening for a prayer vigil outside Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center where Stow is hospitalized.

Police say Stow, a paramedic from Santa Cruz, was punched in the back of the head by two unidentified assailants and fell to the pavement after the Dodgers' 2-1 victory over the Giants on March 31.

The vigil is organized by The Wall-Las Memorias Project, which helps Latinos with HIV and AIDS. The group is urging the public to combat violence and alcohol abuse among young adults.

LA Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa says officials are working every lead to find those involved in the attack.

“We are asking the public to come forward with any information that hasn’t been provided up to now,” says Villaraigosa, who’s been meeting with LAPD Chief Beck. “We are doing everything we can to find these individuals and bring them to justice.”

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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