Mendocino County to lose marijuana permit income

Pot/Marijuana Stock Photo

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A bud grows on a marijuana plant at Oaksterdam University

A major source of funding for the Mendocino County Sheriff's Department is going up in smoke over the county's decision to cancel a medical marijuana permit program.

County officials have calculated the sheriff's department will be losing more than a half-million dollars in revenue after the Board of Supervisors voted last week to end the program of issuing permits to cannabis collectives.

The permits allowed the collectives to grow up the 99 plants at a time, but also required deputies to conduct monthly inspections.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that sheriff's officials collected $663,230 last year in fees for the inspections.

Despite the loss of revenue, Sheriff Tom Allman says he doesn't expect to have to lay off any deputies.

Supervisors voted to stop issuing the permits after representatives from U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag's office warned that Mendocino's law was at odds with federal law.

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