UCI study finds racial, economic disparities in ovarian cancer care and survival

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Researchers looked at differences in the care for women with ovarian cancer and how it related to their race and socioeconomic status.

Researchers looked at differences in the care for women with ovarian cancer and how it related to their race and socioeconomic status.

Their study of 50,000 women with ovarian cancer found that race and income play a role in ovarian cancer survival, specifically that African American and poor women are less likely than white and affluent women to receive the top standard of treatment.

The University of California Irvine study found that five-year survival rates varied greatly. Poor women had survival rates 30 percent below those of more affluent women – regardless of ethnic background.

Nationwide, only about 30 percent of ovarian cancers are diagnosed before the disease spreads. About 15,000 women in the U.S. die from ovarian cancer each year.

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of gynecological cancers.

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