Tell us how 9/11 changed your life, and we'll share your story

A couple holds a sign with a photo of James Patrick White, who died in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, during a memorial service commemorating the ninth anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center Saturday, Sept. 11, 2010 in New York.
A couple holds a sign with a photo of James Patrick White, who died in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, during a memorial service commemorating the ninth anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center Saturday, Sept. 11, 2010 in New York. AP Photo/David Handschuh

Our lives all changed on Sept. 11, 2001, the day that jets crashed into the World Trade Center.

For most of us, the changes reverberate to this day: People we've lost — or gained; things, like boarding an airplane, that are forever different; feelings about people — be they neighbors or total strangers — that are new and unfamiliar.

Many people have shared how 9/11 changed them. You can read some of their stories below.

How has the decade since that awful day changed you? We want to hear from you: Post your story in a comment below, send us an email, share your story on our Facebook page or tweet us @KPCC.

We'll gather your stories and post them on this site this week. If you have photos you'd like to share, tweet them with the hashtag #911KPCC or follow KPCC on Instagram and share them on Instagram with the hashtag #911KPCC.

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Eunice Hanson's life changed forever on 9/11. Her son, Peter, was on board the second plane to crash into the World Trade center, with his wife, Sue Kim Hanson, and their 2-year-old daughter, Christine Lee, all of South Pasadena, according to South Pasadena Patch. "Peter, I still feel the terrible pain that went through my whole being when Dad, holding the phone, heard your last words," Eunice Hanson wrote to her son and his family after their death. " ... The thought of the three of you in each other's arms in that final moment will never leave me."


Kristian Petersen of California wrote on the Yahoo! Contributor Network that he is traveling less by air and more by train and car. "This is behavior modification," he said. "At first, I merely adapted to TSA and the more time intensive screening of airplane consumers. After a time I began to revisit other options. In doing so I have become a train enthusiast. On three occasions I substituted train for airline for a trip from California to Chicago or reverse."


Nikki Roberts of San Jose told MSNBC.com that her entire life changed. On Sept. 11, 2001, she worked as a paramedic in Manhattan when the first plane hit the first tower. Her husband worked on the 95th floor of the south tower and perished when it collapsed. Roberts was left with their four children, as well as twins who were born in May 2002. "I was lucky my husband called me, and we talked" before the tower collapsed, she recalled. "I was able to talk to him for a few minutes, and I kept telling him I would be there to get to him, but never made it. At least we were able to say goodbye. We were on the phone together when the tower collapsed."


Things changed in a different way for Moorpark resident Ozzie Niazi. He is a Muslim whose parents are from Afghanistan and was in fifth grade when the Twin Towers fell, Moorpark Patch reported. After 9/11, he found himself the object of ethnic slurs and suspicion, which he says made him harder. "The thing is this: I learned they were going to judge me anyway. I might as well say what's on my mind," he told Moorpark Patch.

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