US & World

Extreme athlete Felix Baumgartner survives record-breaking supersonic skydive

A screenshot of Felix Baumgartner jumping from the stratosphere, October 14, 2012.
A screenshot of Felix Baumgartner jumping from the stratosphere, October 14, 2012.
Ed Joyce/KPCC
A screenshot of Felix Baumgartner jumping from the stratosphere, October 14, 2012.
In this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria is seen in a screen at mission control center in the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. Baumgartner jumped from an altitude of 120,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in free fall, which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.
Stefan Aufschnaiter/AP
A screenshot of Felix Baumgartner jumping from the stratosphere, October 14, 2012.
In this photo provided by Red Bull, Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria steps out from his trailer during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday, Oct. 14, 2012.
Balazs Gardi/AP


Extreme athlete Felix Baumgartner has landed on Earth after a jump from the stratosphere in what could be the world's first supersonic skydive.

Baumgartner landed in eastern New Mexico desert minutes after jumping from 128,000 feet, or 24 miles.

He lifted his arms in victory shortly after landing.

He took off in a pressurized capsule carried by a 55-story ultra-thin helium balloon. He jumped from more than three times the height of the average cruising altitude for jetliners.

Baumgartner hit a speed of 706 mph before activating his parachute about 5,000 feet above the ground in southeastern New Mexico, The Telegraph confirmed. Achieving Mach 1 would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.

He broke records for fastest and highest freefall.

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