US & World

Sandy's effects linger nearly a week after the storm

People wait on line on East Houston Street in Lower Manhattan following Superstorm Sandy on November 4, 2012, in New York City. The wait time was only forty minutes when purchasing with smaller amounts in just a gas can. With the death toll currently over 100 and millions of homes and businesses without power, the U.S. East Coast is attempting to recover from the effects of floods, fires and power outages brought on by Superstorm Sandy.
People wait on line on East Houston Street in Lower Manhattan following Superstorm Sandy on November 4, 2012, in New York City. The wait time was only forty minutes when purchasing with smaller amounts in just a gas can. With the death toll currently over 100 and millions of homes and businesses without power, the U.S. East Coast is attempting to recover from the effects of floods, fires and power outages brought on by Superstorm Sandy.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Here's what's happening today in the New York-New Jersey area, nearly a week after Superstorm Sandy devastated the region:

Update at 3:44 p.m. EDT Elections

New Jersey is adjusting its election rules to accommodate voters affected by Sandy. WNYC's Anna Sale reports that some voters will be allowed to cast ballots by email.

Here's her report:

"The measure is aimed at displaced voters and first responders who have had to leave their counties – or even the state. They can apply for a ballot by emailing their local county clerks office, but it's not as simple as clicking their choices and sending it back. Voters have to print the ballot and then fax it or scan it back.

The state also announced that displaced voters who can't make it to their home polling places can cast a provisional ballot anywhere in the state.

Any New Jersey voter can vote early through Monday, after the state ordered county clerks and local election offices to stay open through the weekend.

Election officials are continuing to assess how many polling places will have to be moved because of power outages or structural damage. In some cases, voters may have to cast ballots tents erected for the day."

NPR's Allison Keyes is reporting for our Newscast Unit that New York City officials are saying that tens of thousands will need housing in the wake of the storm, some for the long term.

"People don't like to leave their homes but the reality is going to be in the temperature," Cuomo said.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the city will have to find housing for between 30,000 and 40,000 people. He also urged those without heat to move to warming shelters opened by the city.

"Please, I know sometimes people are reticent to take advantage of services. The cold really is something that is dangerous," he said.

Here's more from the AP about Sandy's impact:

"Though New York and New Jersey bore the brunt of the destruction, at its peak, the storm reached 1,000 miles across, killed more than 100 people in 10 states, knocked out power to 8.5 million homes and businesses and canceled nearly 20,000 flights. Damage has been estimated $50 billion, making Sandy the second most expensive storm in U.S. history, behind Hurricane Katrina.

More than 900,000 homes and businesses in New Jersey were still without electricity."

NPR's Martin Kaste reported a 1.5-mile line at the one gas station in Bayonne, N.K., that still had gas. The wait was as long as six hours, he said.

"The line is traffic," he said. "It is the only real traffic on that street."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.