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Court-ordered immigrant deportations down in recent months

Earlier this year protesters marched in the lobby of the Immigration Court building. That court in Los Angeles has ordered far fewer deportations than in previous years.
Earlier this year protesters marched in the lobby of the Immigration Court building. That court in Los Angeles has ordered far fewer deportations than in previous years.
Corey Moore/KPCC

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Los Angeles County is home to one of the largest concentrations of immigrants without papers – and to a similarly large backlog of immigration court cases.

With a nationwide record 400,000 deportations in each of the last two years, the federal Department of Homeland Security has faced criticism for deporting many immigrants without serious criminal backgrounds.

But the latest data indicates that around the country, court-ordered requests for deportation have decreased by a quarter from last year.

During November, the government reported almost 15,000 new Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, filings seeking deportation orders. That’s almost six percent down compared to the previous month.

Immigration courts started ordering fewer deportations in 2010 — largely because of efforts to streamline those courts’ work, along with new criteria for federal agencies and the courts when determining whether to deport an immigrant.