Boston Marathon bombings: FBI releases photos, video of 2 suspects (UPDATED)

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 1" and "Suspect 2" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

Photos of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing, released by the FBI.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 1" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 2" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 2" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 1" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 1" and "Suspect 2" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 1" and "Suspect 2" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 2" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 1" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 1" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

FBI

A photo of "Suspect 1" in the Boston Marathon bombings.

President Obama And First Lady Attend Interfaith Service For Victims Of Boston Marathon Bombings

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A nun hugs a woman at an interfaith prayer service for victims of the Boston Marathon attack titled "Healing Our City," and attended by President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross on April 18, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

People gather outside of the Cathedral of the Holy Cross as US President Barrack Obama and wife Michelle arrive at the interfaith ceremony.

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JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

People attend the 'Healing Our City: An Interfaith Service' dedicated to those who were gravely wounded or killed in the Boston Marathon bombing, at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston.

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JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

The president and first lady arrive at the memorial.

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JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick and his wife Diane Patrick attend the 'Healing Our City: An Interfaith Service' at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston.

Outside Boston University's Marsh Chapel on Wednesday, friends gathered to remember graduate student Lingzi Lu. She was one of the three people killed in Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Shannon Stapleton /Reuters /Landov

Outside Boston University's Marsh Chapel on Wednesday, friends gathered to remember graduate student Lingzi Lu. She was one of the three people killed in Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon.


UPDATE 2:36 p.m. The FBI has released photos and video of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings and is asking for the public's help in identifying them.

FBI Agent Richard DesLauriers says the photos came from surveillance cameras, photos and other evidence near the explosion sites.

DesLauriers says one the suspects is believed to have planted the devices near the finish line of the race. He says both suspects are considered armed and extremely dangerous.

The explosions Monday killed three people and injured more than 180.

The images were released hours after President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama attended an interfaith service at a Roman Catholic cathedral in Boston to remember the victims, including an 8-year-old boy.

— AP

UPDATE 9:09 a.m.: The painstaking work to identify a bombing suspect from reams of Boston Marathon footage yielded a possible breakthrough as investigators focused on a man seen dropping off a bag, and then walking away from the site of the second of two deadly explosions, according to the Associated Press.

The discovery of the image — found on surveillance footage from a department store near the finish line — was detailed by a city politician two days after the attack that left three people dead, wounded more than 170, and cast a dark shadow over one of this city's most joyous traditions. The footage hasn't been made public.

President Barack Obama attended the interfaith service honoring the victims Thursday in Boston, and closed his eyes at times while listening to speakers. There was a heavy police presence around the city's main Roman Catholic cathedral as residents lined up before dawn, hoping to get one of the roughly 2,000 seats inside. By 9 a.m., they were being turned away. We will post a video of the service when it becomes available.

Streets were blocked off around the Cathedral of the Holy Cross in Boston's South End.

Among the hundreds in line was 18-year-old Eli Philips. The college student was a Marathon volunteer and was wearing his volunteer jacket on Thursday morning.

He said he was still shocked that "something that was euphoric went so bad."

Ricky Hall, 67, of Cambridge, showed up at 8 a.m. but was turned away from the line to get inside that was already stretching down at least two city blocks, so decided just to stay outside.

"I came to pay my respects to the victims," he said, but was also angry that someone would desecrate the marathon and urged maximum punishment for the perpetrator.

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Thursday the FBI wants to speak with individuals seen in at least one video from marathon, but she says she isn't calling them suspects.

Without providing details of the men's appearance or what the video shows, Napolitano told the House Homeland Security Committee on Thursday that "there is some video that raised the question" of individuals the FBI would like to interview. She said the investigation is continuing "apace."

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said he shared the frustration that the person or people responsible were still at large, but he said solving the case will not "happen by magic."

"It's going to happen by doing the careful work that must be done in a thorough investigation," Patrick said. "That means going through the couple of blocks at the blast scene square inch by square inch and picking up pieces of evidence and following those trails, and that's going to take some time."

The bombs were crudely fashioned from ordinary kitchen pressure cookers packed with explosives, nails and ball bearings, investigators and others close to the case said. Investigators suspect the devices were then hidden in black duffel bags and left on the ground.

As a result, they were looking for images of someone lugging a dark, heavy bag. Investigators had appealed to the public to provide videos and photographs from the race finish line.

City Council President Stephen Murphy, who said he was briefed by Boston police, said investigators saw the image of the man dropping off a bag and matched the findings with witness descriptions of someone leaving the scene.

One department store video "has confirmed that a suspect is seen dropping a bag near the point of the second explosion and heading off," Murphy said.

Separately, a law enforcement official who was not authorized to discuss the case publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity confirmed only that investigators had an image of a potential suspect whose name was not known to them and who had not been questioned.

Several media outlets reported that a suspect had been identified from surveillance video taken at a Lord & Taylor department store between the sites of the bomb blasts.

At least 14 bombing victims, including three children, remained in critical condition. Dozens of victims have been released from hospitals, and officials at three hospitals that treated some of the most seriously injured said they expected all their remaining patients to survive. A 2-year-old boy with a head injury was improving and might go home Thursday, Boston Children's Hospital said.

On Wednesday, investigators in white jumpsuits fanned out across the streets, rooftops and awnings around the blast site in search of clues. They picked through trash cans, plastic cup sleeves and discarded sports drink dispensers.

Marian Wilson said she tried not to notice the men slowly pacing and looking for evidence on the street behind her as she ate a tuna sandwich at Stephanie's on Newbury, a restaurant a block from the site of the bombings.

"I just go in and out of being completely freaked out," she said.

Boston remained under a heavy security presence, with scores of National Guard troops gathering among armored Humvees in the Boston Common.

Kenya Nadry, a website designer, took her 5-year-old nephew to a playground.

"There's still some sense of fear, but I feel like Boston's resilient," she said. "The fine men in blue will take care of a lot of it."

Dr. Horacio Hojman, associate chief of trauma at Tufts Medical Center, said patients were in surprisingly good spirits when they were brought in.

"Despite what they witnessed, despite what they suffered, despite many of them having life-threatening injuries, their spirits were not broken," he said. "And I think that should probably be the message for all of us — that this horrible act of terror will not bring us down."

Obama and his challenger in the last election, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, planned to visit Boston on Thursday to attend the vigil.

The blasts killed 8-year-old Martin Richard, of Boston, 29-year-old Krystle Campbell, of Medford, and Lu Lingzi, a Boston University graduate student from China.

PREVIOUSLY FROM NPR: Throughout the day, we'll be updating with the latest news about the two explosions Monday near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The blasts killed three people and injured about 180. We'll also be publishing related posts as the day continues. (See this note about how we cover events such as this.)

4:30 a.m. PT. Where Things Stand.

INVESTIGATION: Authorities have reviewed video of a man setting down a bag and leaving the scene, but that does not necessarily make him a suspect. "We need more than that," a source with knowledge of the investigation has told NPR's Tom Gjelten.

While there has been no arrest as of this hour, The Boston Globe says authorities believe they are " 'very close' in their pursuit of the bomber," according to "an official briefed on the investigation, who declined to be named."

FBI investigators have said the key clue to finding who's responsible will likely come from a photo or video taken by a spectator. At the website of the FBI's Boston bureau, officials have posted this appeal for help: "If you have any information that could be of assistance, please call 1-800-CALL-FBI (prompt #3). No detail is too small."

EMERGENCY DECLARATION: "President Obama has signed an emergency declaration for the state of Massachusetts — a move that frees up federal funding to help with crisis management," WBUR writes.

INTERFAITH SERVICE: The public is invited to an Interfaith service Thursday morning at Boston's Cathedral of the Holy Cross, WBUR reports. President Obama, who will speak, is set to attend with first lady Michelle Obama. Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential nominee and a former governor of Massachusetts, is also expected to be there. The service is due to begin at 11 a.m. ET.

NPR's Jeff Brady rounded up the latest news earlier Thursday on Morning Edition.

For more:

Wednesday's Developments.

Tuesday's Developments.

NPR's Coverage.

WBUR's Coverage.

Note: As happens when stories such as this are developing, there will likely be reports that turn out to be mistaken. Wednesday, for example, there were reports from CNN, the AP, WBUR and others that authorities either had arrested a suspect or were about to do that. It turned out that no one had been arrested or taken into custody.

We will focus on news being reported by NPR, other news outlets with expertise, and statements from authorities who are in a position to know what's going on. And if some of that information turns out to be wrong, we'll update.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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