Trade group lifts porn moratorium after HIV scare

Protestors Demand Voluntary 100% Condom Use Policy in Porn Industry

David McNew/Getty Images

HIV-positive AIDS activist and former Playboy Bunny Rebekka Armstrong speaks to the press in front of banners that look like a giant condoms while calling on pornography executive, Larry Flynt, to voluntarily adopt a 100% condom use policy in his sexually explicit films, during a demonstration by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation outside the Flynt Publications building on June 7, 2004 in Los Angeles, California. That April, the $9-billion to $14-billion southern California adult film industry began a 30-day voluntary filming moratorium after two actors tested positive to HIV at the Adult Industry Medical Health Care Foundation (AIM) which tests the adult entertainers for HIV every 30 days. Last year a moratorium was called after a syphilis scare, and another was called this month when an actress tested positive for HIV. The latest moratorium was lifted Tuesday after all performers who worked with the actress were medically cleared.

A porn industry group has lifted a week-old moratorium on adult film production that was prompted by an HIV scare.

The Free Speech Coalition lifted the ban late Tuesday after all performers who worked with HIV-infected actress Cameron Bay were medically cleared.

The coalition says a panel of three doctors concluded that it was safe to resume filming.

Vivid Entertainment Group and other large porn companies honored the moratorium, although it was unclear whether the many smaller producers did so or how many film shoots were canceled.

A similar work ban was enacted last year after nearly a dozen performers were infected with syphilis.

The industry currently is challenging a Los Angeles County law passed last year requiring actors to wear condoms during porn shoots.

More in Health

Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus