House ignores veto threat, votes to delay Obamacare

Speaker of the House John Boehner arrives at the Capitol on Saturday.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Speaker of the House John Boehner arrives at the Capitol on Saturday.

Update 9:20 p.m.  The Republican-run House has voted to avoid a partial government shutdown next week but also delay President Barack Obama's health care law.

Because of that condition, the White House has promised the overall legislation will be vetoed. That means the two sides are edging closer to a shutdown of many federal services Tuesday morning, with no obvious solution in sight.

The House sent the legislation to the Democratic-run Senate early Sunday by 231-192.

The bill would delay much of the 2010 health care overhaul for a year. It would also repeal a tax on medical devices that helps finance the health care law.

The shutdown bill will probably never reach Obama because the Senate's majority leader, Nevada Democrat Harry Reid, says his chamber will reject the measure first.

AP

Update 3:42 p.m. The White House says President Barack Obama would veto House Republican legislation that would delay much of the president's health care overhaul for a year and cancel a tax on medical devices.

The White House statement comes as the GOP-run House prepares to debate a bill averting a government shutdown Tuesday morning, but delaying the health care law and repealing the tax as the price for doing so. The medical device tax helps finance the health care law.

The Democratic-run Senate has approved legislation preventing the shutdown and leaving the health care overhaul alone. That 2010 law has been Obama's proudest domestic achievement.

The White House says the House bill would advance a narrow ideological agenda and threaten the economy. It says the bill pushes the government toward a shutdown.

AP

Previously: House Republicans propose one-year delay to Obamacare

House Republicans have settled on a plan to amend the government funding bill.

That plan includes both a one-year delay in implementing Obamacare and the repeal of the Affordable Care Act's medical devices tax.

RELATED: If the government shuts down, what will be open?

Republicans exiting their closed-door meeting say they are united behind this strategy.

"I think conservatives are winning," said Rep. Tim Huelskamp of Kansas. "Stop Obamacare and not stop the government is what we're hearing from folks at home, so I think leadership's listened."

Republicans insist their proposal doesn't have to lead to a government shutdown, and could even get some Democratic support in the Senate. That is unlikely.

A vote is expected around 2 p.m. Pacific, 5 p.m. Eastern Saturday.

NPR

Our Original Post:

All eyes are on a pair of closed wooden doors in the basement of the Capitol. Behind those doors, in room HC-5, House Republicans are plotting their next move in the ongoing shutdown showdown.

On Friday, the Senate approved a short-term spending bill aimed at avoiding a government shutdown. What it didn't do was defund the Affordable Care Act.

That's what a handful of Senate Democrats and a larger contingent of House Republicans have been demanding in exchange for keeping the government funded.

It's now the House's move, as Texas Sen. Ted Cruz tweeted yesterday:

House Republicans say they intend to attach something to the spending bill and send it back to the Senate. Just what to attach is what's being discussed behind those closed doors.

Possibilities include a one-year delay of the Obamacare individual mandate or a repeal of the medical devices tax that's part of the law.

The key for House Speaker John Boehner is coming up with a plan that can get near unanimous support from his conference. That's because he won't be getting any votes from House Democrats.

And if one of these Obamacare-related add-ons passes, it will run into a buzz saw in the Democratically controlled Senate. At least, that was the warning yesterday from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid:

The countdown to shutdown is on. If there's no agreement, the shutdown starts Tuesday.

NPR

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