Feds seek long sentence in 'Jihad Jane' case

The seal of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is seen at the J. Edgar Hoover building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013. The FBI is a governmental agency as a division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) established in 1908.
The seal of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is seen at the J. Edgar Hoover building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013. The FBI is a governmental agency as a division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) established in 1908. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Federal prosecutors are asking for a lengthy prison sentence for a Pennsylvania woman who called herself "Jihad Jane" online.

Prosecutors say in court papers that Colleen LaRose should spend decades behind bars for plotting to kill a Swedish cartoonist whose work had offended Muslims.

Prosecutors say LaRose's sentencing should serve as a deterrent to "other lonely, vulnerable people who might be enticed by online extremists promising fame and honor."

LaRose and two others convicted in the plot, Jamie Paulin-Ramirez of Colorado and Maryland teen Mohammad Hassan Khalid, face sentencing next week.

LaRose faces a maximum of life in prison. The others could get up to 15 years in prison for conspiring to provide material aid to terrorists.

blog comments powered by Disqus