Arts & Entertainment

Carl Kasell retiring from 'Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me!'

National Public Radio's Carl Kasell puts on his headphones before delivering one of his last newscasts during the Morning Edition program at NPR December 30, 2009 in Washington, DC. Kasell continued his work on the game show
National Public Radio's Carl Kasell puts on his headphones before delivering one of his last newscasts during the Morning Edition program at NPR December 30, 2009 in Washington, DC. Kasell continued his work on the game show "Wait, Wait... Don't Tell Me!" but on Tuesday, NPR announced that he would retire from that show as well.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
National Public Radio's Carl Kasell puts on his headphones before delivering one of his last newscasts during the Morning Edition program at NPR December 30, 2009 in Washington, DC. Kasell continued his work on the game show
National Public Radio's Carl Kasell delivers one of his last newscasts during the Morning Edition program at NPR December 30, 2009 in Washington, DC. Kasell continued his work on the game show "Wait, Wait... Don't Tell Me!" but on Tuesday, NPR announced that he would retire from that show as well.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images


Carl Kasell, judge and scorekeeper of NPR's hit game show "Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me!" is retiring this spring, NPR announced on Tuesday.

Kasell, who worked for NPR's Morning Edition for three decades, said he enjoyed working for the news quiz show.

"It was loads of fun and gave me a chance to meet and talk in person to the audiences that I felt I had known for so many years on the air," Kasell said in a statement. "I can honestly say I am the luckiest man around to be able to have worked at a job I love for so many years. It's truly been a joy to me." 

Kasell joined "Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me!" in 1998. Prior to that, he did newscasts for NPR's Morning Edition from 1979 to 2009.

NPR said that after Kasell retires, he will still do voicemail greetings for the show's winners and "occasionally appear on the program." Already, more than 2,200 people have Kasell on their voicemail, NPR said.

NPR is inviting Kasell's fans to leave him a voicemail message at 1-888-924-8924. No replacement has been named yet, according to Peter Sagal, host of "Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me!"

Retirement will give Kasell more free time, according to Sagal.