Politics

More than 100 Los Angeles pot shops closed

In this file photo, a staff member of the Cannabis Buyers Club walks up the stairs to the club in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles on election eve on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 1995 in Los Angeles. On Monday, the city attorney and L.A. police chief announced an education campaign to alert business owners and realtors about requirements of Proposition D, which permits only about 100 registered pot dispensaries in the city, taxes them and restricts where they can locate.
In this file photo, a staff member of the Cannabis Buyers Club walks up the stairs to the club in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles on election eve on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 1995 in Los Angeles. On Monday, the city attorney and L.A. police chief announced an education campaign to alert business owners and realtors about requirements of Proposition D, which permits only about 100 registered pot dispensaries in the city, taxes them and restricts where they can locate.
Rene Macura

Los Angeles has shut more than 100 pot shops since it began enforcing new rules for medical marijuana dispensaries. But officials say many more continue to operate outside the law.

On Monday, City Attorney Mike Feuer and Police Chief Charlie Beck announced an education campaign to alert business owners and realtors about requirements of Proposition D.

That measure, passed by voters last year, permits only about 100 registered pot dispensaries in the city, taxes them and restricts where they can locate.

About 800 dispensaries were believed to be operating before the law took effect last summer. Feuer says his office has prosecuted nearly 300 pot shop owners and employees.

But while dozens of dispensaries have closed, the Los Angeles Times says more than 300 have registered to pay taxes.