Environment & Science

Space station awaits for Russian craft after delay

The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-12M space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station (ISS) blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. The Russian rocket carries U.S. astronaut Steven Swanson, Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev.
The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-12M space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station (ISS) blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. The Russian rocket carries U.S. astronaut Steven Swanson, Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev.
Dmitry Lovetsky/AP
The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz TMA-12M space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station (ISS) blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. The Russian rocket carries U.S. astronaut Steven Swanson, Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev.
BAIKONUR, KAZAKHSTAN - MARCH 26: In this handout photo provided by NASA, The Soyuz TMA-12M rocket launches carrying Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Steven Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos to the International Space Station, March 26, 2014 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Skvortsov, Swanson, and Artemyev will spend the next six months aboard the International Space Station. (Photo by Joel Kowsky/NASA via Getty Images)
NASA/Getty Images


A Russian spacecraft carrying three astronauts is on track to arrive at the International Space Station after a delay.

Docking with the orbiting outpost was set for Thursday evening.

The trio blasted off from Kazakhstan on Wednesday on what was supposed to be a six-hour "fast track" to the space station. But an engine burn intended to adjust the Soyuz spacecraft's path never occurred, delaying the docking.

The American and two Russians on board were not in danger.

Since the space shuttle's retirement, NASA has relied on the Russians to ferry astronauts. It's paying two private companies including SpaceX to transport cargo and eventually astronauts.

NASA says SpaceX's fourth supply run to the space station set for Sunday has been postponed because of a problem at the launch site.