Riverside weighs whether to end red light traffic cameras

In this Sept. 29, 2010 file photo, a red light camera setup is seen in Los Angeles. The city has since voted to stop using the cameras for enforcement. Riverside is set to decide the same issue on Tuesday.
In this Sept. 29, 2010 file photo, a red light camera setup is seen in Los Angeles. The city has since voted to stop using the cameras for enforcement. Riverside is set to decide the same issue on Tuesday. Nick Ut/AP

The Riverside City Council will vote Tuesday on whether to get rid of the city's red light traffic cameras. 

Councilman Mike Soubirous said most residents want to do away with the cameras and that the city's flawed data does not prove the cameras make intersections safer.

"We found out that some of the numbers they were quoting as far as that they had seen a 40 percent reduction in crashes at one intersection, or 52 on another. Well, that was based on one or two traffic collisions for the entire year for that intersection. So these numbers are very, very low," Soubirous said.

Among those in favor of the cameras staying is Councilman Mike Gardner, who said the system isn't flawless, but it's more beneficial than not.

"I think it does affect the way that people drive in a positive way — makes us more cautious," Gardner said.

Riverside's red light traffic cameras have been in place for eight years. 

If the council votes to end the program, Riverside would join dozens of cities in the state that have banned or removed cameras, including Los Angeles, Long Beach, Fullerton and San Bernardino.

blog comments powered by Disqus