Napa Earthquake: Injury tally climbs to 120; 6 critically injured after 6.0 quake

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Update Monday 6:30 a.m.: The USGS upgraded the quake to a magnitude 6.1 Sunday but has since downgraded it back to a 6.0.

Earlier: A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck near Napa early Sunday morning, damaging a number of buildings and knocking out power to thousands in California wine country. By noon. 120 people were reported to have been taken to Queen of the Valley hospital with injuries, 6 in critical condition. You can track aftershocks and see more details on the quake here. Many in the area have been posting images of the damage on social media

We'll update this story throughout the day. Refresh this page for more. 

Updates: 

4:39 p.m.: California's earthquake early warning system gains steam

Noting that Berkeley's earthquake early warning system was able to predict the quake 10 seconds before it struck, the director of California's Office of Emergency Services said the state is making progress in putting the system into practice.

"We have been working diligently on implementing an early warning system throughout the state," he said. He said a fully implemented system is about 2 years away.

That echoed an interview KPCC did earlier with researcher Robert Graves, who works on the system for the U.S. Geological Survey. 

"This is certainly something that we're working on and we want to develop the public interface," Graves said. "Right now we're in a beta system, and so it's going out to some of our partners at academic institutions and other scientists, just to evaluate and test the system to make sure everything is working fine." 

The USGS is working with scientists at Caltech, UC Berkeley and the University of Washington to develop the system.

Hear KPCC science reporter Sanden Totten explain how it works: 

The success of the system didn't go unnoticed by California politicians. Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom told NBC Bay Area that "it's crazy that we're not funding it," adding:

“We’ve gotta fund it. I mean, we had a 10-second warning here, we can get up to 60 seconds (warning) most of the experts believe.” 

U.S. Representative Adam Schiff (D-Burbank) released a statement Sunday afternoon calling for the project to be fast-tracked.

"Today's successful use of the early earthquake warning system shows that a full West Coast system would be successful in giving residents, businesses and critical infrastructure an important warning of a large magnitude earthquake," he said in a statement. "Even a few seconds of warning will allow people to seek cover, automatically slow or stop trains, pause surgeries and more."

Schiff helped pass $5 million in funding for the project earlier this year. 

Here's how the early warning appeared to those who received it: 

Video: Early warning system

4:05 p.m.: Nearly 100 homes declared unsafe

Between 90 and 100 homes have been declared unsafe to enter and many more need to be evaluated, officials for California's Office of Emergency Services said Sunday. 

"Please, if you think a building looks shaky, do not go into that structure," until it has been evaluated and found safe, Cal OES director Mark Ghilarducci said. He added that all fires stemming from the quake have since been extinguished.  

The quake was felt as far north as Ukiah, and as far south as Salinas, California, he said. 

1:39 p.m.: Napa schools to close; shelters open

Napa Valley Unified School District has cancelled classes on all 30 of its campuses for Monday, NBC Area has reported

Meanwhile, the Red Cross says it will keep its shelter at Crossroads Community Church on 1st Street. 

Vallejo, too, has opened a shelter at Florence Douglas Senior Center on Amador Street.

Update 12:35 p.m.: Injury tally climbs to 120; 6 people critically injured

At a press conference Sunday afternoon, hospital officials announced that 120 people had been treated for injuries sustained during the earthquake. Six were still in critical condition, including several being treated for heart attacks. 

City Manager Mike Parness said as many as 20,000 people — a quarter of the city's population — were without power. Some people may be without running water for a week, he said. Crews can't begin to repair damages until they're sure that opening the street won't cause more damage, Parness said. 

At least 15 buildings have been declared unsafe and cordoned off, Parness said, though most businesses remain open. The city manager suggested that visitors check their lodgings before coming to town, but stressed that there were many areas still taking guests in.  

Bay Area TV station KTVU posted surveillance video of the quake: 

Congressman Mike Thompson said a number of areas in Vallejo have also been damaged, including several historical structures on Mare Island that have since been red-tagged, he said.  

Update 11:25 a.m.: Seismologists investigate fault, soil damage

Teams of geologists have been sent to Napa to assess the damage done in the area, in order to find which fault was likely responsible for this morning's quake. 

Caltech seismologist Dr. Egill Hauksson told KPCC the most likely culprit was the West Napa Fault, though there are other possibilities in the area. Hauksson said the quake moved horizontally. "The same sort of motion we see on the San Andreas [Fault], so two blocks moving sideways past each other," he said. 

The quake struck about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) beneath the surface in an area near the Sacramento Delta that is home to very soft soil. The depth, he says, is about average for California quakes.

"It's extremely soft, extremely water-saturated, so there should be some spectacular effects from that soil deforming and amplifying the ground motion," Hauksson said. "It means that the ground is probably going to liquefy and is going to spread out, so that it flows away. Any structure that sits on it is going to either get severely damaged or is going to be tilted so that it's not usable any more," he added.

Hauksson told KPCC's Sanden Totten that seismologists will be keenly interested in seeing how the "Bay Area mud" — as the type of soil is known — behaved during the quake, and how levees in the area held up. 

— KPCC staff

Update 9:31 a.m.: Napa, Governor Brown declare emergency as crews assess damage

Napa city and county officials declared a state of emergency at a news conference this morning. Governor Jerry Brown followed suit moments later. The declaration will allow the city and county to apply for emergency funding to help with the cleanup efforts. 

Napa city and county officials said they were investigating damage done to many of the buildings in the historic city center to determine which, if any, need to be red-tagged. Several iconic buildings including Sam Kee Laundry building, Goodman Library and Napa County Courthouse appear to be affected. 

City Manager Mike Parness said crews were inspecting around 100 reports of gas leaks, and working on plugging around 30 water main leaks. He cautioned that that number will likely change as crews begin their assessments. Eighty-seven people have been injured, he said.

Napa police captain Steve Potter said the city experienced "relative calm for an earthquake of this magnitude." There had been no reports of looting or violence. The city has already received a number of donations, he said, which they'll use to fixing some of the damage downtown. Potter said serious injuries appeared to be the result of falling debris, not of fire. 

Parness said Napa agencies would update the public again at noon.

Update 8:48 a.m.: USGS upgrades quake to magnitude 6.1

The U.S. Geological Survey has upgraded the magnitude of Sunday morning's quake to 6.1, a minor update maybe, but as ABC News reports, that minor uptick can mean more intensity:

Twitter: ABC News correspondent

KQED's Mina Kim lives in Napa. She told KPCC it looks as though someone flipped her house onto its side. After making sure her family was all right, she went outside to see flames in the distance, and damage throughout the area. 

"There are these old historic buildings, buildings with brick facades and a lot of those facades have crumbled," she said. "There was some significant damage to the historic courthouse and even as I was driving down there, transformers were blowing. It was quite a dicey situation even a couple hours after the earthquake."

You can hear more of her interview here: 

Update 8:16 a.m.: 87 reported injured; Dozens of aftershocks reported

Eighty-seven people have been taken to Queen of the Valley Hospital, The San Francisco Chronicle reports. Three are in critical condition, the paper said. 

Meanwhile, as many as 42 aftershocks have hit the area in the wake of this morning's earthquake, according to the USGS. The largest was a 3.6 that struck Napa at 5:47 a.m. 

You can see more using KPCC's earthquake tracker tool.

Update 7:34 a.m.: 2 injured, power knocked out for thousands

A large earthquake rolled through California's northern Bay Area early Sunday, damaging some buildings, igniting fires, knocking out power to tens of thousands and sending residents running out of their homes in the darkness.

Two major injuries have been reported, and hospitals have been very busy with moderate injuries, Napa Division Fire Chief John Callanan said.

The 6.0-magnitude quake caused six significant fires, including at four mobile homes, Napa Division Fire Chief Darren Drake said. The damage from the fires is not yet clear but it appears significant, he said. Several other smaller fires have been reported and firefighting efforts have been complicated by broken water mains.

Gov. Jerry Brown issued this statement Sunday morning:

“My Office of Emergency Services has been on full activation since early this morning and is working closely with state and local emergency managers, first responders and transportation officials to respond to impacts to residents and critical infrastructure. These public safety officials are doing all they can to help residents and those living in affected areas should follow their guidance and instruction.”

The earthquake struck just before 3:30 a.m. about 10 miles northwest of American Canyon, which is about 6 miles southwest of Napa, in California wine country, Leslie Gordon of the U.S. Geological Survey said. It's the largest earthquake to shake the Bay Area since the 6.9-magnitude Loma Prieta quake in 1989, the USGS said.

"There's collapses, fires," said Napa Fire Capt. Doug Bridewell, standing in front of large pieces of masonry that broke loose from a turn of the century office building where a fire had just been extinguished. "That's the worst shaking I've ever been in."

Bridewell, who said he had to climb over fallen furniture in his own home to check on his family before reporting to duty, said he was starting to see more reports of injuries.

The shaking emptied cabinets in homes and store shelves, set off car alarms and had residents of neighboring Sonoma County running out of their houses and talking about damage inside their homes. Officials say widespread power outages have been reported in the area.

"It was a rolling quake, said Oakland resident Rich Lieberman. "It started very much like a rolling sensation and just got progressively worse in terms of length. Not so much in terms of shaking, but it did shake. It felt like a side-to-side kind of rolling sensation. Nothing violent but extremely lengthy and extremely active."

The USGS says the depth of the earthquake was just less than seven miles, and numerous small aftershocks have occurred in the Napa wine country.

"A quake of that size in a populated area is of course widely felt throughout that region," said Randy Baldwin, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Golden, Colorado. "The 6.0 is a sizeable quake for this area. It's a shallow quake. It's about 6 miles deep. We received hundreds of reports on our website from people that felt it in the surrounding area."

California Highway Patrol Officer Kevin Bartlett said cracks and damage to pavement closed the westbound Interstate 80 connector to westbound State Route 37 in Vallejo and westbound State Route 37 at the Sonoma off ramp. He says there haven't been reports of injuries or people stranded in their cars, but there are numerous flat tires from motorists driving over damaged roads.

Highway Patrol and the California Department of Transportation was checking roadways for damage, Bartlett said.

California Highway Patrol Officer Daniel Hill told KTVU-TV that road damage appears confined to the Napa and Sonoma areas. He said there appears to be no damage to major bridges in the Bay Area.

In Napa, city spokesman Barry Martin there has been significant damage. Store windows were broken and water mains broke in several location, one of which left at least one street flooded. Power outages left streetlights dark.

Numerous emergency vehicles were on the roads in Napa and Sonoma counties.

—Associated Press

7:12 a.m.: 6.0 quake rattles Napa

California's wine country was shaken before dawn by a magnitude 6.0 earthquake, with the epicenter south of Napa; it's the largest quake to struck California's northern San Francisco Bay area since the 1989 Loma Prieta quake, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. [See more details using KPCC's Earthquake Tracker]

The San Francisco Chronicle cites Napa Fire Capt. Steve Becker, who says there were “numerous” injuries reported across Napa. The Santa Rosa Press-Democrat is reporting a fire at the Napa Valley Mobile Home Park. They cite Captain Becker, saying four homes were a total loss, with up to eight additional units suffering minor to moderate damage.

Governor Brown says the Office of Emergency Services is on full activation since early this morning and is working closely with state and local emergency managers, first responders and transportation officials to respond to impacts to residents and critical infrastructure. "These public safety officials are doing all they can to help residents and those living in affected areas should follow their guidance and instruction.”

The shaking set off car alarms and had residents of neighboring Sonoma County running out of their houses in the middle of night. Officials say widespread power outages have been report in Sonoma County.

"It was a rolling quake, said Oakland resident Rich Lieberman. "It started very much like a rolling sensation and just got progressively worse in terms of length. Not so much in terms of shaking, but it did shake. It felt like a side-to-side kind of rolling sensation. Nothing violent but extremely lengthy and extremely active."

The USGS says the depth of the earthquake was just less than seven miles, and numerous small aftershocks have occurred in the Napa wine country. It's been dubbed the South Napa Earthquake.

"A quake of that size in a populated area is of course widely felt throughout that region," said Randy Baldwin, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Golden, Colorado, "The 6.0 is a sizable quake for this area. It's a shallow quake. It's about 6 miles deep. We received hundreds of reports on our website from people that felt it in the surrounding area."

https://storify.com/kpcc/6-0-earthquake-strikes-napa

 

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