Health

Heat hacks: Tips for employers and workers to stay safe when working under the sun

Brick layer Allan Sandahl, of Los Angeles City Construction Forces Division, wipes the bricks with a wet sponge under the sun while working on a sidewalk construction project on August 25, 2010 in Los Angeles, California.
Brick layer Allan Sandahl, of Los Angeles City Construction Forces Division, wipes the bricks with a wet sponge under the sun while working on a sidewalk construction project on August 25, 2010 in Los Angeles, California.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

If you think it's hot now, brace yourselves. It's only going to get hotter.

SoCal is expected to have a 15 to 25 degree increase these next few days and The National Weather Service says Imperial, Riverside and San Diego counties are going to feel excessively dry heat the most.

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While some people can stay cool by being indoors, others have no choice but to face the heat working outdoors. 

"When workers are working outside in the heat, particularly if they're doing strenuous work, they really need to be mindful of watching out for their own health,"  Amy Martin, Chief Counsel of Cal/OSHA says.

"Employers have go to make sure that they are providing water, shade, rest for employees and that they have thought about what they are going to do in an emergency."

If you're not sure how to stay cool working in the heat, here are some heat tips to consider as an employer or as an employee from KPCC and Cal/OSHA .

What you can do as an employer

Prevention is key, and the first thing employers need to do is "they need to make sure they are in compliance with the heat regulations that are enforced by Cal/OSHA," Martin says. Some ideas for prevention include the following:

What you can do as an employee

Workers in the fields of agriculture, construction, petroleum, landscaping — "Anybody can be susceptible to heat illness when they're working in the sun," Martin says. Here is what you can do when working in hot temperatures:

"Employees should know if they are working for an employer that is out of compliance, they can ... call us and make a complaint," says Martin. "We will never reveal their name if they don't want to."