Environment & Science

Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego say they're meeting water savings goal

East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) water conservation technician Rachel Garza (L)  inspects a water meter with home owner Michael Shain as she performs a water conservation audit of a home on April 7, 2015 in Walnut Creek.
East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) water conservation technician Rachel Garza (L) inspects a water meter with home owner Michael Shain as she performs a water conservation audit of a home on April 7, 2015 in Walnut Creek.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California's largest cities say they're meeting mandatory water conservation targets ordered by Gov. Jerry Brown.

Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco are reporting significant water savings in June ahead of a statewide report. The state gave communities nine months starting June to hit conservation targets as high as 36 percent.

Savings are compared to 2013, before Brown declared a drought emergency. Regulators are urging residents to neglect their lawns this summer to save water.

Consumption dropped 24 percent in San Diego. The city has complained its 16 percent target is unfair because it doesn't give credit for drought preparation efforts.

San Francisco says it saved 20 percent, more than double its target.

Cities that don't meet their targets face state-ordered conservation measures and fines.

You can view past water use data for Los Angeles and San Diego here, and for San Francisco here.

This story has been updated.